Banking on Digital Growth
Banking on Digital Growth

Episode · 1 year ago

74) #ExponentialInsights: Your Newest Business Strategy - Loving Your People ft. Mohammad Anwar

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If you could triple your revenue in 3 years with a new business strategy, would you do it?

In that case, love is your newest business strategy.

In this episode, I interview Mohammad Anwar, President & CEO of Softway and host of Love As a Business Strategy podcast, about how he transformed himself and his business with a people-first approach.

What we talked about:

-What love means in the workplace

-Mohammad’s aha moment & ensuing self-awareness

-Steps for leaders to transform their culture with love

-The hardest and most important micro-commitment for a leader

You can find this interview and many more by subscribing to Banking on Digital Growth on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or here.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Banking on Digital Growth in your favorite podcast player.
 

It's about the humans that are at the workplace there at the center of your business and making sure that all of your business strategy and everything you do you take that into consideration from a people first approach. And that's like the simplest way to defining love as a business strategy. You're listening to Banking on Digital Growth with James Robert Lay, a podcast that empowers financial brand marketing, sales and leadership teams to maximize their digital growth potential by generating 10 times more loans and deposits. Today's episode is part of the Exponential Insight series, where James Robert interviews the industry's top marketing sales and fintech leaders sharing practical wisdom to exponentially elevate you and your team. Let's get into the show Greetings and hello, I am James Robert Ley and welcome to the 74th episode of the Banking on Digital Growth podcast. Today's episode is part of the Exponential Insight series, and I'm excited to welcome Mohammed and watching the show because I've known Mohammed personally, going all the way back to 2000 and six. We've got some history, man. Yep, you got some history. It's been so good to watch Mohammed's personal journey of growth. Mohammed is the CEO of Software A. They are a business to employee solutions company with a global team of over 200 people based in Houston, Texas, in Bangalore, India. And more importantly, Mohammed believes that love is a business strategy, which is in fact the name of the podcast that he hosts with with with his team and also the name of his upcoming book and love as a business strategy is exactly what we're going to talk about today. Because it's not every day that one thinks about love and business going hand in hand together. So welcome to the show, Mohammed. Thank you, James. Thank you for having me. I'd like to open up with a question from the table top cards that I got as a gift from my friends over at Total Expert. If you could un invent any past invention, what would you un invent? Wow, I've never been asked a question like that. Interesting. I don't know. Sometimes I feel like you should I mean un invent some of the things that have created the social distance because we're so into this pandemic and staying away from each other. The social distancing and some of the technology and inventions have allowed us to be socially distant. The positives are that you can get work done. You can still get stuff done. But it's kind of lost that whole social aspect of connection, human connection and interaction because of it. So maybe sometimes I wish we didn't have it. We could be forced to interact with each other. Maybe those are the kind of things that we don't invent just for the Covid beard. That's it after that happened back. Yeah, you know, I was thinking about that like it would be interesting to see what the world would look like today if we never saw the mobile phone explode like it did Number one and then really number two. Not just the mobile device, but what Steve Jobs did with the iPhone because that's where we started to see the massive acceleration. Because if you go back, yeah, we had the BlackBerries and whatnot. But there's still a lot of, like, face to face communication and relationships being built because, really, if you think 2007, when Steve Jobs launched what was going on, YouTube was starting to blow up Facebook is really, you know, coming from the universities and expanding. So 2000 and seven was was was a tipping point for many. And now we're here 14 years later, looking back. And there's a great song by the DJ Armin Van Buren...

...that that he begs the question. You know, everyone's still connected, but are we still connected? So yeah, it's it's an interesting thing, and I think that's why the the subject matter of both your podcast and, really more importantly, your upcoming book. Love as a business strategy is so important because you open up the book talking about the love languages of business, which I really connected with because my wife and I reference the five love languages by Gary Chapman in some of the marriage prep work that we do with with other couples. So what is the love language of business? So ultimately, you know, because love has different connotations to it, and in terms of the business we wanted to define exactly what does it mean? Love in the workplace and the best way we describe it is it's about the humans that are at the workplace there, at the center of your business and making sure that all of your business strategy and everything you do you take that into consideration from a people first approach. And that's like the simplest way to defining love as a business strategy. It's about how do you make sure you care for the people? You have empathy for the people that work in your organization and you prioritize them over maybe profits for shareholders. And ultimately, by doing that, it's not that you're giving up on your profitability or your shareholders priorities, but in fact that by prioritizing your people, you're able to still achieve your business outcomes. And that's kind of the whole emphasis of her book. I saw David C. Baker. He's the author of The Business of Expertise. He tweeted the other day. When are we going to stop looking at employees as a cost and really begin to view them as an investment in our future growth? And I think about all of the massive transformations that are happening in every vertical, including banking. Technology is driving that Covid has been driving that I really picked up last year that E X or employee experience is going to separate those that just survive this pandemic with those compared, who are thriving out of the pandemic. When we look at all of this massive change and transformation going on, why do you feel employees or sometimes put last in the thought process? I think it has to do with what we believe Business rational is. I think businesses have now rationalized profits over people as the right thing to do, and what has happened is it's it's become impersonal. It's like, Hey, you know, we have to cut costs and profits have gone down. We're still profitable, but our projections weren't as good as they were, so we need to cut costs, and the first thing we think of is potentially and I'm not saying this always happens. But there are lots of cases where people come at the expense of that right, so layoffs, you know, furloughs. All of those kind of things do become a viable option for businesses to maintain their profits. So I think it's it's like defining what is rational in business is not necessarily moral with the people say and you think about banking and you know it's this idea of being driven by profits and shareholder profits. But it's it's fascinating to me if we go back to 2019. Headline came out in The...

Washington Post with a picture of Jamie Dimon, and the headline reads, Who is the CEO of Of Chase and Jamie Dimon and this group of the top CEOs? This is the headline a group of top CEO says maximizing shareholder profits no longer can be the primary goal of corporations. So how can an organization, be it a financial brand, begin to transform this mindset to a not only just a people first but an employee first, because so much conversation has been made over the past couple of years about C X and customer experience. But I think we're learning out of the pandemic is if we don't have a strong E X specifically in this digital world, R. C X is just going to fall completely apart. So how do we begin to transform some of these? Maybe just these historical legacy mindsets. It's important to understand that with today's day, and especially with the code, would be exposed the need for agility, adoption and being able to really be more empathetic even towards their employees because now what code is exposed? Is that the traditional way of working where you could come to an office space and the managers can micromanage and control and and, you know, kind of get work done and pushed the work to get it done? Top down. It's not working in a covid environment. It's demonstrating more and more that you have to trust your people. You have no choice. You can go to people's home if their work from home type organization and start breathing down their neck or putting pressure to get work done. You really need the people to be motivated and inspired and empowered to get work done and reach your achieve your business outcomes, especially in an environment where there's so much uncertainty and change. It's very difficult to maintain that top down structure, which was traditionally representative, most corporations in a covid environment. And so if organizations are not going to truly empower and trust their people and give them an experience, too, bring their full Selves and their ideas to the table for innovation, creativity and adapt ation to this new market environment, they're not going to be successful. They're going to probably even disappear. They may not exist, and so businesses have had to really adapt to this environment, and they recognize that if you don't put the people at the center of all of this who really run our businesses, who are the assets of her business, then we're not going to really survive in these uncertainty times. But I think it's really made a case for change even further through Covid. You know, it's that idea of a lot of our cultural perspective, our business perspective. Our education perspective has still been driven. Coming out of the Industrial Revolution of the 19 twenties, we're moving into the fourth Industrial Revolution, the age of AI, which once again there's the irony. In the age of AI, we're talking more about people about humanizing these experiences. Empathy, Why from your worldview? Why is that Why, as we move further down this path of technology, we're coming back to the people and it's almost like the question that I opened up with, like, if there's one thing that you could un invent, what would that be? And we were talking around the same idea. But why is that? I think, because at the end of the day. You know, the the idea that a I is going to take over a human's job is far harder to achieve than you know, predicted. Ultimately, I think we're recognizing the value of, you know,...

...culture and human interaction and relationships and how people feel and how that has an impact on businesses. Ultimately, whether you're on the end of a consumer spectrum or you're the actual employees producing or helping with the business. And I think PR probably not ever going to be able to replace the need for humans in a business environment and ultimately a. I is, you know, going to automate a lot of things, maybe change the way we work. But humans are always going to be at the center of it and all your numbers. Every single metric you measure inside of your organization. There's always going to be people and people's behaviors that drive those numbers. At the end of the day, people do business with people, people trust people, and I really think the secret of this specifically when we talk about behavior transformation, whether that be from the internal perspective of the employee or here in the banking space, you know, getting people to modify their behaviors, you know, to to spending savings, etcetera They are much more likely to be held accountable by another human being, and not by a robot or an app or a I. Because I think about like you've got all of these amazing savings apps today on the market that provides some type of coaching. You've got all of these amazing fitness apps that have come out of covid. But nothing holds you accountable cause there's a big correlation between financial well being and physical well being between money and wallet and health. Nothing. Hold someone accountable in the fitness side, like actually having to show up to the gym and face that trainer. Look them in the eye, and they're going to hold you accountable to help you become the very best version of yourself. I don't think an app is ever going to be able to do that because it's so easy to fall back on our human tendencies and preconceived notions and and mental models. You've got a great story that you unpack in love as a business strategy, which was really kind of like what led you to this point personally, because I think you can speak from the point of truth as an executive, as a leader of how you were able to shed some of this baggage and wait, that was that almost took. Took you in the company down, right? Can you talk through some of that to get catch us up to speed? Because I think it's important to hear this. Sure. So I've been a CEO of a company for almost 18 years now. Started the business when I was 20 years old, you know, still in college for seeing my computer science degree had a lot of success. And about 12, 13 years into the business, you know, he had almost 300 employees inside of an organization, and we had multi million dollar contracts doing a lot of work, and at about 2015, we were almost on the verge of bankruptcy. We almost did not survive, and that was like the very first time that I truly faced existential threat. After almost running the business for 12 13 years and during that existential threat, it got me to realize that it wasn't the problem with the market. It wasn't our systems or process or any of that that was leading to like it wasn't a strategy that was leading to the device of our company. It all centered around how I lead the company. As a leader, I had become greedy. I was selfish. I was...

...focused on How do I take care of myself, my well being, my lifestyle And I did not trust the people of software. I wanted to trust the processes and tools over the people of software, like I was trying to find any way. I do not depend on people, and I was very arrogant. I was very rude to people and it was my way or the highway. And to be honest, it wasn't that I it was just the way I was. It was I learned these behaviors and I learned these behaviors of a leader having total control and authority for the organizations through the interactions with my customers or with the corporate world. And I thought if that's how they operate, that's how I must operate And so a lot of these were learned behaviors and it almost led us to your device. People were not coming to work, too, really put their heart and soul into it. They were just coming, for transactional reason just to make a paycheck. And I had ignored the culture of a company for far too long where there is nothing hiding but the truth that this is all my fault. My selfish behaviors lead us to the situation. So I went through this whole introspective journey and realization that I the buck, stops with me. I created this. I did this to Software and I have to take ownership and I got to do something about it. I got to change myself. My behavior is my leadership style. And that's when I realized, after witnessing a football game American football game from my alma mater, University of Houston, and they won amazing comeback story. And when I heard the coach, then Tom Herman speak about what led to their success and their see them so much, he spoke about something called The Culture of Love. And he said it was the love that each of these football players had for each other. Not the I love you, bro, kind of love but a genuine love. I I hold your heart in my hand kind of love and that love makes them fight for the other person, not for themselves. Selflessly, they go on the field to fight for each other, and when he shared that, it was. So Number one woke me up, and it made me realize that I did not love my team. I did not care for my team, like how he described. And that's when I realized that I had to change our culture and I had to change my behaviors. And that's when we got onto this journey of transformation for myself personally. First and then the rest of my organization also went on this journey, and that's where we came to the realization that love can be a business strategy that helps business surviving. Three years later, we're making three times the revenue we did in 2016 with higher EBITA and lesser employees. So our business outcome is like just off the it changed entirely, and I've got so much empathy because you know my story and we don't have time to get into that today. But it it I was on the brink of losing my business in 2012. The business was going great. It wasn't even losing my business. It was it was actually a little bit deeper. It was losing my family, which I think if I lost my family, my wife, my kids, because she was threatening divorce and because I was all in on the business and my priorities were completely out of whack. You know, like you, we both got started...

...young. Anyway, we go all the way back to 2006 and I was 1920 getting this thing started. And you, you know, my last real job was playing in a punk rock band. And you do You learned these behaviors from others because you think, Well, if they're doing that, it must be right. But But it will take you to the brink of destruction. You're looking down into the abyss and thinking if I keep going, there will be no more. And then you stop. You pause and you think, and you have this transformational moment, which was the University of Houston football game and Tom Herman, and I think it's interesting because you're talking about American football. That's like one of the you would never think even, probably more so than business to connect love and football together. And yet here we are, two executives talking about love as a business strategy. And you talk about this like selflessness, like like the giving of yourself. And we can go back and we can study the ancients. We talked like Sinica and, you know, ST Thomas quietness. Um, he defines love as willing the good of the other person. Now, this is a podcast for financial brand leaders. Yes, these are very left brain driven people. They're very smart. They're very analytical. They think in numbers they should, because they're taking care of people's money. But how? How can we help to transform the conversation and the narrative that they have with themselves? Like, kind of you did, because you're trusting the process, not the people. How can we help them transform that conversation? Because if we're looking for transformation, transformation must start with the self, then the team, then the organization in the banking world, then in the lives of the people within the communities that a financial brand serves, what can I leader? Due to transform their own mindset and perspective, technology has transformed our world, and digital has changed the way consumers shop for and buy financial services forever. Now consumers make purchase decisions long before they walk into a branch if they walk into a branch at all. But your financial brand still wants to grow loans and deposits. We get it. Digital growth can feel confusing, frustrating and overwhelming for any financial brand marketing and sales leader. But it doesn't have to because James Robert wrote the book that guides you every step of the way along your digital growth journey. Visit www dot digital growth dot com to get a preview of his best selling book, Banking on Digital Growth, or order a copy right now for you and your team from Amazon. Inside you'll find a strategic marketing manifesto that was written to transform financial brands, and it is packed full of practical and proven insights. You can start using today to confidently generate 10 times more loans and deposits now back to the show. So it's obviously you're absolutely right, like if you want to change the culture of your business and you know Peter, Dr Rightfully said, like cultural strategy for breakfast. And we have a scene which is if culture eats strategy, breakfast and behaviors Eat culture for lunch, meaning you can't really build a culture to help you propel your business if you don't start with the individual behaviors and for leaders, and it's everyone in the organization that has to change their behaviors. But it's the leaders who set the don't. So it starts with the leaders, behaviors and leaders mindsets because the people who report the leaders again are learning the behaviors of the leader. Whether you like it or not, you're setting the tone, and people are going to see your behaviors, your mindset, the way you approach things, and...

...they're going to learn it and practice it. And there's modelling modelling that comes from that, right? Absolutely. So it's important that leaders have to start and the steps to beginning your transformation journey of your behaviors and mindset is through self awareness, and you can only achieve that self awareness through introspection and feedback. Introspection is your intrinsic, looking in within yourself to understand how you think, how your how you see the world and then feedback lets you understand how the world sees you, so that gap between what you think you are being experienced by others versus how others are truly experiencing you is the self awareness gap, and you can only begin to work on your transformation of your behaviors and mindset if you begin to have self awareness. And unfortunately, most leaders, the higher they go up in their career path, the less self aware they become. Because we've been working inside of systems where our behaviors have actually got us to get those promotions. And once you're in those leadership positions, now we're coming and telling them, Hey, what got you here isn't gonna really work anymore. So you gotta change your behaviors. It's really hard for them to understand that and believe in it and build self awareness that how they're behaving is actually setting the tone the wrong way. And it's taking your business backwards. So I would say the first step for leaders to start working on the transformation starts at self awareness self awareness. And I liked how you frame that. It's it's the internal perspective of how you see yourself, the external perspective of how others see you, and that's very hard and as a leader and having been down a journey very similar. You you take things to the brink, and then you realize that you're going to lose it all. And it the age old adage of the desire to transform, to grow from good to great, to be even better must be stronger than the desire to remain the same. And I'm looking at the banking world right now whether you're at a bank or credit union, and we're right here where this idea of digital transformation I think the challenge up to this point has been, it's the conversation has been so focused on technology, technology, technology, and we're not thinking about the people who have to deploy these technologies and all the behaviors that are wrapped up in deploying new technologies and reengineering self to a degree almost like you, we can go down a complete rabbit hole with this idea of reprogramming the mind neural plasticity. We're not going to go there because I think coming back to your point, you write and you just shared this behavior eats culture for lunch. What is the root of what you call Ms behavior? Yeah, so the first of all, it starts off it, you know, the type of mindset a person represents right a fixed mindset versus a growth mindset and in a fixed mindset, you look at other success as a failure on your part, or you You're not happy for others when they're succeeding, or you look at challenges as obstacles instead of opportunities to grow. And so, for the mindset has a lot to do with it. But ultimately, when it comes to how we treat each other, you know how I might treat you versus someone else is different for the exact same situation. Maybe you can come report bad news to me, and I'll be like, It's okay, James And then someone else comes, reports bad news to me and I'm like, Well, that's horrible. How did you let this happen? Why did you let this happen? And you see are different treatment of each other in the workplace. It does happen, and a lot of that is stemmed from unforgiveness...

...because we are human at the end of the day and we may have had an interaction with someone inside of an organization where we've been hurt intentionally or unintentionally, and because of that, we are holding onto unforgiveness and we're holding onto unforgiveness. The next time I see someone who has hurt me and I have unforgiveness towards If they bring any type of information to me, the way I behave with them is going to be different. And that leads to misbehaviors. And so we see that far too common in a workplace where unforgiveness as the root cause for a lot of the misbehaviors with each other, which creates toxic work cultures, leads to politics, leads to people speaking behind each other's back, tarnishing others, reputation, anything and everything that you see in a toxic workplace. When you go look deep into it, it's because of unforgiveness. You know, when we think about forgiving another person, the act of forgiveness is often an act of release and setting the prisoner free, and that prisoner is not the other person. That prisoner is yourself and all of the feelings and the emotions and the animosity that we might have based upon whatever it might be when it comes to this idea of of forgiveness and you talk about this idea of self awareness, uh, the internal self awareness, the external self awareness or the awareness of how the world perceives you, how you perceive yourself. Is it becoming more challenging? Or how is it becoming more challenging in this digital world that we live in, particularly post covid were on 24 7. We get stuck in what I call the digital growth operating environment of doing, and there's four of them you can be learning. You can be thinking you could be doing. You can be reviewing, but you only can be in one environment at one time. And the only way that someone is going to gain self awareness is by taking time to stop, pause and escape the doing to review where they're at where they've been. What do they learn from those experiences? How can they can't actually think about it and frame it so that they can do even better during the next round? What would your recommendations be to maybe just tap the brakes a little bit to escape that cycle of continuous doing? Sure, so it's very common in the workplace to reflect, reflect on what we've done, review our work and retrospect on it, or reflect on it and improve. So a lot of the times leaders and employees are so focused on the what and the how things got done that we forget to ask ourselves the why question. Why was I nervous when I got into the presentation? Not more. So. How could I have presented better, but rather asking yourself the question. Why was I nervous? Why was I not prepared? Or why was I getting upset when somebody in the audience started asking me these questions? And so it's going deeper. It's looking within yourself deeper in analyzing your emotions to why you're behaving the way you are and not just looking at what you could have done better, how you could have done better. We believe that that's reflection and introspection is much deeper. So I would just say Start asking yourself questions differently. And then you can get into a police of introspection, which is definitely needed for self awareness, and it helps more. How important is it to go through this period of reflection, Not only with yourself, because I think we can get trapped inside our own minds inside our own prisons To have that perspective of an outside adviser, a coach, a guide,...

...however you want to frame it because I know going back to 2012, when I almost lost my my wife and kids because I was just a jerk in a bad husband and a bad boss. I had to get that outside perspective. And I told myself, since that moment, I was always going to invest, not pay. I was going to invest in myself, you know, and have that coach guide. And to this day it's probably over six figures easily now that I've invested back because the payoff has been exponential. But how important do you think it is to have that outside voice, particularly as a leader, to gain some of this awareness and reflection? Any thoughts on that? Yeah, absolutely. I think it's like I like I mentioned, introspection is more understanding your inner self, but it does not complete the self awareness process. Have to seek input from others as to how they are experiencing you. So you can understand that cognitive dissonance of what I think I am being experienced as versus how truly people are feeling are experiencing you and your interactions. So that's number one important. But also it's not that hard As a leader, you have people who are reporting to you they are your best feedback mechanism. They are your They are the people who work with you on a day to day. They are the ones who experience your behaviors on a day to day. They can give you the feedback from me personally, my feedback of the way I behaved. That awareness came to me when my own team decided that they were going to have the courage and they were going to give me the feedback I needed here about how I was behaving, of how I was making the organization filled with fear. I needed to hear that it was difficult as hell. I didn't want to believe it at first, but without that feedback from my own team, I would have never realized or brought about self awareness that this is how my behaviors are impacting others. And so for me personally, it was it was it was a lot simpler and the only reason my people began to give me feedback is because I started to practice or strike to practice the culture of love. I started to look for the goodness in my people and not their weaknesses, and I started to serve them I started to put their needs before mine and when I was starting to become the servant leader or strive to become a servant leader because I don't believe in there yet that's when people were, like, more comfortable and psychologically safe to say no. I got feedback for you. We see how hard you're trying to change. We see how hard you're trying to take care of us. I want to give you the gift of feedback. This is how you the way you behaved in this meeting. This is how it made us feel. This is what it resulted in. And you need to know this without that real time feedback For a leader, it is very difficult to change their behaviors to become more effective. Leader as you. As you were talking through that, I couldn't help but think of another leader from the University of Houston. Burn a brown. You know, she writes frequently about courage and one of the things that she says his courage just starts with showing up and letting ourselves be seen. You know, for who we are. It's funny that as we're in this, you know, still navigating through this post covid world. We're all wearing mask. We were wearing masks long before Covid hit the scene. It's just those masks are now physical and we can see them. But I think the more that we have the courage to take those mask off and have sometimes the difficult conversations. But the honest conversations. Because all...

...transformation starts by telling the truth by telling the truth to yourself about where you've been, where you're at, where you can go next, and then by telling the truth to those that you work with. And when you tell the truth. That's when the transformation process can really just unfold and begin. Because we begin to let go of the past of the baggage, things that are weighing us down in the present moment. That will prevent us from moving forward into creating an even bigger, better, brighter future for ourselves, for our teams and for for those in the in the organizations and the communities that we serve. As we look ahead, it's going to quickly add I want to say like something. I think that's related to what you just said is a lot of the times people think love as a culture means it's soft, it's being nice. And the reality is that true love as a culture, you make it easier to have the stuff conversations. You make it easier to hold each other accountable. There is a better, and it is a better environment to actually have those honest, truthful conversations knowing that hey, when Mohamed gives feedback to James, it comes from a place of love. So I only care about your well being. I care about your success so it makes your organization's actually have better accountability, better ownership, better vulnerability, vulnerability where people take ownership and apologize. And we are able to get through those challenging situations of conflict a lot easier and faster as a virtue of love. Inside of your culture versus the intuitive feeling is love. As a culture that means you're just going to be really nice to each other. And it's not that it's a great point. That's a really good point. I want to build on that thought. You know it. There is such a thing as tough love. There is a thing as tough love. But in coming back to the idea of fitness and the coach, the coach is going to push you because they see something in yourself that you don't see. They have another perspective, and they want to help you achieve that better version. And so I I It's a great point. I'm glad you brought that back. This is not necessarily about being soft or quote unquote nice. It's about, and I'm a fall back to ST Thomas Kwan. It's about willing, the good of another person. Because when I have your best intentions in mind, not my my own, I want to see you succeed. I want to elevate you up to the next level. And when this happens internally, naturally, culturally, this perspective begins to expand out externally, and that's where the customer experience truly begins. Transformation, because no longer is it about just serving the needs of the company. But it's about serving the needs of the customer and what they need to realize their best version of themselves. And and and this really has been such a great conversation as we look ahead towards the future, can you just share one practical recommendation that you would recommend for financial brands to just take a small action? Because that's how transformation begins. It's a small step, a small action so that they can begin to look at and consider adopting love as their own business strategy. I would say, you know, we call the smaller actions micro commitments, making small commitments. It's the small things you do that make the bigger impact in culture. And so...

...the micro commitments. I would say the easiest and yet probably sometimes the most difficult is showing gratitude to your employees to your co workers. And you know, it goes a long way if you if it's handwritten versus Horrible, even it doesn't take a lot of effort. But if every boss out there started to just make a commitment to write once a week, a thank you note to one of their employees, I know what it means to the employee for being valued, respected, appreciated and showing their gratitude. It can do miracles for the employee to show up to work, you know, wanting to do more to serve each other, to serve the company that they work for. When they know that they are appreciated and go, it's not very expensive. There's no investment except five minutes of your time and not just show up, show up with their hearts, show up with their mind, show up ready to take part in this whole perspective of love as a business strategy that right there, I'm gonna build upon that. Finish this podcast. Go grab. Even if it's just a sheet of paper, write a thank you note a note of gratitude to someone that you work with, thanking them for all the good that they do, celebrating them for who they are as a person. And you will continue to move forward and make progress along this journey. Mohammed, thank you so much. If anyone is listening, they want to continue this conversation. They want to connect. Say hello. What's the best way for them to To reach out and find you? Sure. So you can go to our website software dot com slash L. A. B s labs software dot com slash L A B. S, which stands for love as a business strategy, is the acronym. If you go there, you will find podcasts are contact information linked to linked in profile everything that you need to get in touch with us and learn more about our book and our podcast, and the book comes out April 27th. Correct? That is correct. April 27 20. Mark that date on your calendar. Subscribe to the podcast ahead of time You're doing great work and thank you so much once again for joining me on another episode of Banking on Digital Growth. Mohammed. Thank you, James, for having me appreciate it as always. And until next time be well, do good and wash your hands. Thank you for listening to another episode of Banking on Digital Growth with James Robert Ley. Like what you hear. Tell a friend about the podcast and leave us a review on apple podcasts, Google podcasts or Spotify and subscribe while you're there. To get even more practical improvement insights, visit www dot digital growth dot com to grab a preview of James Roberts. Best selling book Banking on Digital Growth or order a copy right now for you and your team from Amazon. Inside, you'll find a strategic marketing and sales blueprint framed around 12 key areas of focus that empower you to confidently generate 10 times more loans and deposits until next time, be well and do good.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (221)