Banking on Digital Growth
Banking on Digital Growth

Episode · 11 months ago

64) #ExponentialInsights: Gratitude: The #1 Element for Success in 2021 w/ Sam Kilmer

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The mind can only hold one thought. But it can choose one of two opposing sides — positive or negative, abundance or scarcity.

In 2019, we were running around to conferences and growing our digital presence at 7%, focused on what we didn't have. In 2020, suddenly, we were staying home and growing digital at 70%, learning to be grateful for what we had.

In this episode of Banking on Digital Growth, I talk with Sam Kilmer, senior director at Cornerstone Advisors, where he leads the fintech advisory practice working with industry providers, fintechs, and investors.

We talked about:

- The key element for success in 2021

- Roadblocks that could trip up financial institutions going forward

- The philosophy of first principles thinking versus traditional thinking

You can find this interview, and many more, by subscribing to Banking on Digital Growth on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or here.

You and I both know that if we scriptedthis, the audience would smell a rat. People don't like that kind of stuffanymore, and maybe they never did. You're listening to Banking on DigitalGrowth with James Robert Lay, a podcast that empowers financial brand marketing,sales and leadership teams to maximize their digital growth potential bygenerating 10 times more loans and deposits. Today's episode is part ofthe exponential insight Siri's, where James Robert interviews the industry'stop marketing sales, and Fintech leaders sharing practical wisdom toeexponentially elevate you and your team. Let's get into the show. Greetings inHello, I Am James Robert Ley and welcome to the 64th episode of theBanking on Digital Growth podcast. Today's episode is part of theexponential insight. Siri's where I am excited to welcome Sam Kilmer to theshow. Sam is the senior director at Cornerstone Advisors, where he leadsthe fintech industry practice along with some selected adviser engagementswith banks, credit unions, industry providers and investors. Hello, Sam,and welcome to the show today. Hey, good to be with you again, James.Robert. As always. Absolutely, absolutely, you know, to to start theconversation Let's just reflect back on the century that 2020 waas in and ofitself and just for you personally, what were some of the greatest lessonsthat you learned Looking backwards? You mean back over the last decade orcentury? I wasn't there the whole century. I'm kind of old, but not thatold. Last year. Well, I'm just saying 2020 felt like a century in and ofitself that we worked through because I think by midyear it felt like we hadalready lived a decade. And by the time that we ended, it felt like we lived acentury. I saw a quote the other day, you know, some some. Sometimes it feelslike time moves where, you know, decades, you know, progress feels likeit takes decades. And then other times we feel like we make a century's worthof progress in a week. Yeah, it's a good point, you know, looking back over2020. The way I look at it is it was the culmination of several years andthen the concentration of let's just call it maybe three or four years worthof change, all in one big shock or stress test to the at least to thebanking industry, to the financial services industry. But I think to agreat many of us, which was which was, if we're all kind of graduallydigitally transforming at a 7% year over year pattern or something, whathappens when it's 70% all in one year? Andi, I think my big take away wasgratitude and not taking many things...

...for granted. I think many of us walkedaway if we weren't already tremendously grateful for things like our familiesand our our school teachers. And, you know, we could go on and on. Wecertainly are. Now we see what these people have had to go through. But, youknow, I just when I when I think about it, look at things like holiday retailsales. James Robert. They came out higher in 2020 that in 2019. If you'dasked me that in April, I would have said no way. But they came out higherthat they just shifted even mawr than people expected. So we just we learnedhow to deal with shift. I guess I think you're tapping into a really biginsight and a really big secret that I want to bubble up to the surface. Hereyou mentioned gratitude. I think that's going to be a key element for many ofus continuing through 2021 because the mind can Onley hold two thoughts or onethought at a time. But there's two opposing sides. There's the positive orthe perspective, the mindset of abundance. But on the flip side there'sthe negativity, the mindset of scarcity. So by continuously focusing on what'sgoing well, it will help the mind. Naturally, you're going to train themind to naturally move in that direction to that point. What is goingwell, what are you specifically excited about right now with with your view ofthe world? Well, I think if you look at, you know,just coming into 21 here and you're looking at still record interest in thetech sector and in ah, lot of development of positive change ofhelping people, I think another. Another thing that I've seen really,really be on the rise is just Whether you're a bank or you're a fintech oranything is a real focus on. Not just we have something that's cool, but howdo we help people with some people historically referred to his financialeducation. Or, you know, some people try to apply other technology to it,like analytics or AI or whatever. Forget the technology. And let's juststart with the premise that we're trying to help people, and I thinkthat's that's absolutely front and center and so, like, I'll just comeback to the gratitude thing and say, I think many of us We're hustling abouttwo airports and conferences and many things in to 2019 and in 2020 when thatwas taken away, we replaced it with a healthy sense of gratitude for thethings that we have. I think the other take away from me on this chance Robertthat I want to point out, is when we talk about things like digital andgrowth and in your case, both digital growth, there is a natural tendency towant to talk about the technology. Can I think that's fine? But I would saythere's just been a real focus on people, and even when you transform orchange your delivery model as an...

...organization, whether you're a bank oryour any business, if you go from full change from physical delivery of retailto e commerce. There's still people involved in that. They're just doingdifferent things, and the leaders of different things, of things in demandthere, just in leadership has never gone out of style. It's never gone outof demand. It's just that the skill sets have changed. I'm hearing echoesfrom a recent conversation that I had with carryin on the podcast Who's thechief marketing officer at J. A. M M B in Jamaica. And one of the things thatthat that particular bank is being driven by is a purpose, or they'rethey're literally banking on love. That is their central thesis, that is, theretheir purpose that is their North Star and to your point, helping people. Whatis this all about? I mean, like like, let's come back to how one of theancient writers define love. It is toe will the good of another person. And Ithink in a time like we're in right now, one of two things happens. We eitherturn inwards and focus on ourselves and our needs, which is not a really goodplace to be, or we turn externally to focus on the problems of others andsolving those problems. And as a result we rise together and and I agree withyou this idea of digital digital growth. It is not about technology, which iswhy in banking on digital growth, there was one chapter dedicated to thesubject. It's about using technology to bring people together, and to thatpoint when we look ahead at 2021 even beyond, what do you see are the biggestopportunities for financial brands to either create or capture or even thestrength that they have to further capitalize on? Well, you know when wecome back to the people issue. But I would say that the other factor thereis just going to be, Let's just call it knowledge. So you're using knowledge tohelp people and you're using the people because they have the knowledge and thebill to deliver that. And I would point Thio, you know, a couple of things isas financial brands are less defining themselves by the geographic zip codein which they reside and think about communitycommunity. I'm not suggesting that community isn't geographic, isn't acommunity. It's one flavor of that But I will say that I see a lot of promisein people focusing their help again. Back to we want to help people. Help isthe new sales, you know, right? But I don't I don't think it's just a spinner,a buzzword or pivot, you know, in language and anything cynical, veryriel. But I think it's easier to apply help, too, groups that you know well,so, you know, when I started out in the industry working and database marketing,I mean, we're talking about 1 to 1 and segmentation and all that that's fine.What I'm talking about is...

...organizational focus on specific niches,whether it's a commercial bank that gets to know a couple of industriesreally, really well, or a community bank that focuses in on some specificniches in their areas or whatever. But I was looking over our Gonza bankerawards that we do every year and thinking of someone like DougSutherland over it. Trans Pecos Banks, who worked on this, you know,establishment of a niche in bank M D with, you know, in their particularcase, helping people are helping people there helping doctors. They chose avery specific market that they could focus on. I just I think we're going tosee a lot more of that. I hope that we do, because there's the old adage theriches are in the niches. And I you know, I I recently had been Stop it onWho's the founder and CEO over at Unify Money? Neo Bake Getting started up andthey're focused on the high income, you know, someone who makes $150,000 andover there from their market research. 18 million to 25 million. But he waslike they still have challenges and issues with money and they're trying tosolve those problems. If, if not, they're even more amplified. And thereare doctors in that. So when we look at this idea and this is a repeatedpattern and theme that I'm hearing from multiple people now of Of of niche ingof focusing, how do we have that conversation effectively? Because it'sso easy to fall back on the old mindset of looking at this as well that's gonnalimit our growth potential by saying no, you're actually saying yes, Teoh, Avery specific growth opportunity. Yeah, well, I think in many ways youanswered Part of your own question, which was just because you focus on onearea doesn't mean that others won't be inspired by you. You know, you could beyou could be a credit union that serves one branch historically of the militarywho ultimately inspires other branches that want to be served by you. Or thatmay not be the best example. But I would just say by focusing in on themain thing is is getting an identity. Many of us used the term personagetting getting humanity around who you're helping doesn't mean that you'regoing to say no to everybody else. It just means that you're going to focusyour attention on the areas that you know best. And, you know, I mean, Iused them is one example. But you know, one of our lifetime achievement awards,for example, that we gave John Bill, the CEO, retiring of City National Bank.You know, they there's lots of people throughout the country that havedoesn't work with City National now power RBC as I understand it, but theychose to play and win in the entertainment industry and to get toknow it very well, and then they...

...started making some very specifictechnology choices and determining things that they build versus thingsthat they pull off the shelf point being is that that help that strategicsacrifice helped guide them down a path, and it always allowed them to kind ofkeep the North star on that. And I just I Seymour of that. And I think we'llhave more of that. Well, it's by letting go of the past it it createsthe space and time to create the future. And that's a challenge for some becauseit's like we want to cling Thio, thio our winds and our successes. But it'sit's what got us where we're at today is it's not gonna keep propelling usforward. And so it's always gonna be this give and take of, of, of, of deathand rebirth, death and there. I mean, there's a whole archetypal narrativestructure that we could dive deep into, and and so I wanna flip this a littlebit. You know, we've identified some opera tes this opportunity is this ideaof helping focusing down on specific niches on the flipside, though what aresome of the roadblocks that you see some of the challenges that financialbrands their leadership teams marketing team sells. Teams must be aware oflooking out at 2021 beyond. That could potentially trip them up going forward.Well, I think one of the big concerns that I have is a healthy discussion,maybe even including some good, healthy arguments. I'm always looking for good,healthy debate in strategy. If there's not, if there's not that that should bea warning sign. Watch out for that. But even when the strategy is agreed uponand and you have, you know, a visible roadmap, people understand where theorganization is headed. I would say the financial brands need to watch out for,ah, misalignment between what they say and where they invest. So, in otherwords, that that there's this directional intent to their once ortwice a year look at the strategy. Very healthy, but not as much. Not as muchattention being paid to are we Were we honestly and not executing well on thisstrategy? Not looking at our monthly numbers, I mean riel honesty on wherewe not executing and the number one area that I really look at here is justdo you have, um, line of sight into where you're putting resource is andmoving them around to accomplish those things? And I just I think that that'sa little bit too un disciplined in many organizationsand so that you can have the greatest intent. But it's just not gonna happenbecause the proper investments in delivery we could talk about that.Whether it's not like I said, we've talked about this before. It's not justare you investing? A lot of analytics...

...or data are digital first and all thosethings. But do you have the people? Have you brought those people on board?Do you treat that team with the same type of urgency and respect that youwould treat the team of lenders or, historically, branch managers or others?Yeah, let's talk about that because we were talking about that before we hitrecord. And I think it's a discussion that we need to have Mawr and Mawr ofat both the macro level, but also a micro level, because historicallyspeaking, up to this point, we see, on average 60 65% around 80% of quoteunquote digital transformation projects fail. I mentioned a research study thatRon Shevlin had shared on linked in this false hope of technology. Itcreates the essentially a technology bias that we adopt some type of newtechnology, whether that's a and I think, if I could, you know, where haveI seen this the most? It's probably marketing, automation and really mawr.On the CRM side of things. We adopt this new technology, thinking it'sgonna be our savior and come in and make life good for everyone. But thenit fails, because on Lee, a select few have ascended what I call the apex ofawareness. They can see out, see the future. Everyone else is still stuckdown in the cave of complacency. So how do we reconcile and get more people upto the apex to see the future and then lead them through? Because this is anemotional conversation of letting go of the past to create the future. How canwe have more positive discussions to create that that that clarity, thatawareness, that alignment, that consensus, that really, is wheretransformation happens in the first place? Yeah, the playbook's still beingwritten right? It's that there's not like a, you know, like a 10 point planin the dummies text, you know, here. But I would say that it really startsat the top of the organization in rolling up shirt sleeves and makingsure that organizations set expectations and accountability. Andlet me be very specific. Many of the technologies in the areas that we youjust mentioned you mentioned marketing automation and C rms two examples.Those have historically and we'll just stay with those examples because youuse them. Those are two things that have historically been treated asexpenses by cost centers. So we've used financial accounting instead ofmanagement accounting in this banking industry, and we've typically treatednot. And this is important because it's not just the technology spend, but thepeople associated with those technology spends are typically considered costcenters and until the revenue centers or whatever that whatever the front endof that is whether it's a customer, remember, experience Revenue is themore likely, I would say, candidate. But the top line of the organization inthe mission associated with that...

...urgency. The reason why this works forCapital One is because if they don't do those things that you just mentioned.Well, they will not do well next quarter, right? This is a It's anurgency for them for use A for people like bcu. For people like Alliance,they don't have branches. I don't mean if their call centers don't do well ontheir marketing. Automation doesn't do well. It's bad, bad. So we have Thio.That's my first is accountability at the revenue level an experience level?Not well. We've got another cost toe layer into our costumers. It's a bit ofan extreme example here, but I can't help. But you use these these kind ofthese digital first brands that don't have the branch network infrastructure,that they're not necessarily physically tied to the past. But I almost couldsee making a potential argument into the bit of an extreme example. But it'sburn the ships. You know, Brett King the other day was like on LinkedIn, hesaid, You know, if if you're not investing Maurin your digitaltechnology infrastructure than your physical brand structure, we we reallyhave to have some serious conversation. So, like, just burn the ships. Um, youknow, close down the branches reinvest that capital sell off the assets andthen reinvested because then you have no choice. Technology has transformedour world, and digital has changed the way consumers shop for and buyfinancial services forever. Now consumers make purchase decisions longbefore they walk into a branch if they walk into a branch at all. But yourfinancial brand still wants to grow loans and deposits. We get it. Digitalgrowth can feel confusing, frustrating and overwhelming for any financialbrand marketing and sales leader. But it doesn't have thio because JamesRobert wrote the book that guides you every step of the way along yourdigital growth journey. Visit www dot digital growth dot com to get a previewof his best selling book, Banking on Digital Growth, or order a copy rightNow for you and your team from Amazon. Inside you'll find a strategicmarketing manifesto that was written to transform financial brands, and it ispacked full of practical and proven insights. You can start using today toconfidently generate 10 times more loans and deposits. Now back to theshow Well, but you know what, though JamesRobert let me push back on that a little bit because I agree with youthat I think most people in the industry thing Well, yeah, if you're ifyou're Brett King and you're starting from scratch or whatever and you're arevolutionary, well, you know, it's easier for you to do that because youdon't have all this legacy stuff to figure out. But I would say we'refortunate because we actually have examples now of people who burn theships they would. I doubt that they would characterize it that way. But letme give you a good example. In our Gonza Banker Awards this year, we gavea lifetime achievement award to Dave...

Mooney, who is the retiring CEO,longtime of Alliance Credit Union in Chicago. You may have heard of them.They went a lot of awards for being one of the industries best, you know, keptsecrets or whatever best places to do banking. And that's exactly what theydid. He came in and they literally at one point closed all their branches onthis is this is and they came from a Zai recalled. They came from UnitedAirlines. They were united. United Airlines is their primary segment. Youmight not know that now, with the alliance brand. But the point is thatthey re created themselves both in terms of a brand, but also in how theygo to market these organizations. I would just point out like a lion. BCUuse a cap. They just they have a big head start, even if they started as acall center bank or call, sir. The point is that they have a head startbecause they don't have to transform. Now that's all. But they at least inmany of them there is a track. They you can look at what they did several yearsago, and there is a playbook for that. Yeah, well, what you're what you'realluding to is something that I've been exploring. Mawr and Mawr is themethodology or the philosophy of first principles thinking versus traditionalthinking, because traditional thinking is where a lot of I think financialbrands are today because they start with the the limitations. We can't dothis. We were stuck where first principles thinking looks at Hey, hereare all the possibilities that are available. It's it's scarcity, thinkingversus abundance thinking. And it's a book that, you know, I had shared witha lot and you said you got a copy of it Z Who? Not how by Dan Sullivan, who allhave as a guest of the podcast pretty soon. And the point is, we don't needto think, How are we going to do this? It's who do we need to align ourselves?And And I would love to hear your perspective on this from acollaboration standpoint with Fintech because you're doing a lot in thatspace right now. What are the collaborative opportunities? BecauseFintech is historically speaking. Oh, they're the enemy they're looking to donot. Fintech is not necessary looking to disrupt because they have their ownchallenges on their side. You know, they need eyeballs. Traditionalincumbent financial brands have eyeballs and communities alreadyestablished, but they lack the capability that Fintech has where theopportunities to bring both together in alignment and elevate everyone. Yeah,well, there's there are a lot of opportunities, and this is actually oneof the areas. We're gonna come back to this and Zbig resource Challenge rightnow because there are a lot of Finn text that wanna work with banks andcredit unions. They're out there. They're making phone calls. They'remaking you know they're doing the video calls. There are intermediaries outthere. You've probably heard of some of them out there like the moves of theworld, right that want it help with some of the connectivity andinteroperability, I would argue, and...

...this isn't a slam to move or anybodyelse. I've never seen that technology is the primary barrier. It's almostalways economics. And you mentioned I You know, I think the scarcity or thelegacy factor of you know, if you've got a compliance officer that sayswe'll give me five examples of how this has worked before. We're gonna say no.For example. Of course, if you wanna be a pioneer and you're running up againstthat juggernaut, you've got a problem. Okay, But I'll tell you, I Seymour andMawr we and we see this in our researchthat's coming out there. Mawr institutions that want to collaboratewith Fintech more frantic want to collaborate with financial institutions.That's the good news. The bad news is when we ask financial brands out there,especially in the mid sized bank market credit union market, how many resourceis do you have assigned to this. The most common answers are either zero ormaybe one or two. Now you and I have talked about this before, but one ofthe things that I'm always looking for is when somebody tells me something isa priority, I'll usually ask him who's in charge of it, who's who'sresponsible, who's accountable. And if they give me nobody or they give meeight people, it's the same problem. It's accountability. That's the bigissue right now. Is is we think this is gonna flesh out in 21 By the way, whichis boards and CEOs, the demand more resource to be assigned to this andthat there be accountability. I think that's one of the big issues way couldovercome that. Absolutely. I think too. One of the limiting mindsets is where asmaller asset institution I'm gonna come back Thio, You know, the YourGonza Banker Awards. And if there's one success story that I've seen from asmaller asset institution, it's Jill. Cast AEA her 300 million in assets,doing big things leaning in and and and her whole theme. Her whole theme wasliterally pulled from frozen two, and it was a beautiful story to go into theunknown and to do the next right thing and the work that she did with MarkCuban and P. P. P. It's an amazing story, so I don't think I I think thisconversation around assets and resource is and capability. It's to a degree.Sometimes it might be an excuse because Jill is a great example of first principles thinking, starting andlooking at the possibilities and then just going from there. So how do weencourage Mawr Conversation Mawr dialogue to bring people alonginternally culturally, to help leaders overcome the past, to deal with changein the present and really, I think, eliminate the fears that might beholding them back from creating the future? That's a great question. Ithink you're you're hitting on a big...

...you're hitting on a big one and I withJill in particular as I look back on it. And obviously this isn't just a oneyear phenomenon with Jill right on this one. The thing is, is, I think if there's a lesson in what shehas accomplished, it is transparency and the willingness to expressvulnerability, so she'll just puts it out there Hey, listen way Need to getfigure out this P p p thing, I'm taking ideas from all comers. Please let meknow. You know, I I just paraphrased I'm sure she was way more elusive thanwhat I just unloaded there. But the point is, is that she was transparentabout what she was thinking. And it wasn't like there was two personas thatthes sort of internal free person. And then when I go public, I'm Mr Missacumen. And aren't I all put together And you know, like there's thisprofessional versus personal persona that let's be honest, Many of us hadthat for years, almost like we were raised. That way you get yourprofessional, you and your personal you social media blows that up. And I thinkJill is a great example. This and I would point to another person in theindustry, Chris Nichols, Interstate Bank, who just says, Look, this is whatwe're doing in our bank. We're going all these trade shows and this is whatwe're learning and and this is what we're doing around Cove it you don'teven have to agree with him. He's just he's just putting it out there inearnest, and I think he's helping people. But he's not just helpingpeople with what he's doing and giving them ideas. I think what Jill and Krissand others like them are doing is there helping people just get comfortablewith being publicly uncomfortable? Oh, my gosh, you know, I'm hearing somepatterns now bubble up to the surface and this is getting into a biggerconversation of the opportunities of the personal brand, carryin from onceagain from J. M and B. We were having that conversation because she she isthe chief marketing officer. She's an executive, and she was talking aboutthe need for coaching at the executive level because the coach helps someonenumber one, identify where their strengths are that they might not evenbe able to see, but then help them toe lean in and have these uncomfortableconversations publicly. And it's okay if you don't know everything. I thinkthat's one of the greatest strengths as a leader is to raise your hand. Askedfor help, I think to you know, I was just having a conversation with withKaren over Boss Insights and E was at home and you know I had, you know,literally, my kids were popping in and out of it, and she goes, you know, thisis one of the neatest thing she goes. I saw you doing something. It was a C Utwo point of conversation with Kirk Drake and and she goes, it's just thatyou're like the same person I'm like, Well, I think that's we have to be this,you know, we can't have. And I love what you said. We can't have these twodifferent personas. We just have to embrace the who we are. Um good, bad.You know, it's the good, the bad and...

...the ugly. And and years ago, I startedtalking about you know, some of the struggles that I've dealt with andpublicly because I think that the more we could have those honest, real,transparent conversations, the more we inspire others. Toe have those honest,really transparent conversations. What do you think? Well, and I think itstarts with things like this, like you and I think got onto this call here forjust a couple of minutes. We didn't script this. The reason is is becauseyou and I both know that If we scripted this, the audience would smell a rat.People don't like that kind of stuff anymore, and maybe they never did. ButI think that's what Jill, I think has done so well. Is just being an honestleader. She wanted to an uncertain environment with with citizens when shegot there. So she knows what riel with dealing with real fear is like beyondher military background. Right? What is that? She she I think she has done agreat job of Externalizing that and using it to her advantage so that herpeople are inspired by her. But also other things. I'm inspired by her. Imean, she So she makes it easy to be inspired by, you know? Yeah. Yeah, well,you're talking about inspiration. I've been inspired just from you in thisconversation and learning already. How can others who have been inspiredcontinue the conversation, continue the dialogue with you? What's the best wayfor them? Toe to connect with Sam to say hello and and continue thisconversation. Well, you know, in addition to social media, you know, youand I are out there on the on the major channels of LinkedIn and Twitter, but acouple of other vehicles. And this is just in the spirit of we believe incontent, just like you do right time. I'm a writer and contributor, alongwith many of my colleagues at Gonza banker dot com. And so that's onevehicle you mentioned Ron Shevlin earlier. You also mentioned KarenMoynahan from Boston Sites. Actually, Karen was joined to Ron and I on themost recent episode of Fintech Hustle, which is something that Ron and I do interms of interviews with people in the industry. So fintech hustles anothervehicle on, you know, cornerstone crn are stone dot com were out there and,you know, talking. In my case, I advise I do advise banks and credit unions,but my practice areas focusing on helping fintech stand fintechorganizations from the largest to the startup. So we're out there trying toadd value to the conversation and, uh, appreciate all the things that you'redoing. James Robert. Well, absolutely. I wanna come back to the Fintech Hustlethat you and Ron are are collaborating on, you know, biggest insight thatyou've gained from those conversations up to this point. If you could like,Maybe just like to say, You know what? This is something that top of mind keyinsight that I that you've learnt because I think that's what this is allabout. It's about. It's about transferring knowledge of scale. Butit's also about learning because I'm a...

...big believer coming back to this ideaof transformation. All transformation is not about technology. Transformationis it all starts with training and education to gain clarity, to gainawareness into what the opportunities are. And then we can talk about thatpath of how to get there. But you have to provide clarity, so it's aboutlearning. But it's also about teaching. So big key insight, big lesson thatyou've learned from the conversation that that you have and Ron have had onon the Fintech Hustle podcast. Sure, well, you know the big issue of the bigopportunity. An issue for some is, you know, kind of. When you look at how theindustry has changed and how all industries have changed, people say,Well, you know, we've moved to digital sales. I would say we've moved to selfservice buying. Let's let's put it on the other side of that transaction.We're all self service buyers now. We all wanna learn we and we all whenwe're learning, we want to hear We want to hear natural natural language. Nowwe want to hear things that are natural. We don't wanna hear anything that wecould tell us soon as we hear it. Uh, these were messaging points chock fullof buzzwords. They're chock full of not great intent. Okay, so my biggest takeaway is what the hustle is. We started thinking, Well, maybe we need to puttogether presentations and maybe we needed. And then it was like, No,that's exactly what nobody needs right now. What we need is let's just get toWhat was it you said earlier? Who? Not what? Yahoo. Not out. Thank you. Let'sfigure out who are too great people that have diverse thoughts. Maybe onebig company, one small company, diverse individuals. Personally, Let's get himtogether. And let's just ask him what's going on and see what shakes out ofthat and what I learned. Cara Parky of M X, who I met through a f. T. TheAssociation for Financial Technology. I'm a big fan. No, that's not a plug.I'm just saying I am a big fan. Chara put it best. She said, You know what?The hustle, you know, just just changed. Meaning we're all still hustling. Weall still have the same things to do. But because people are self servicebuying now, we just have to think a little bit about what our hustle lookslike. That was actually the inspiration for the name. The first session that wehad. I don't even remember what we called it. But we care was one of theguests. And after she said that, you know, the hustle just changed. I said,Hey, do you mind if we co opt that? Because I really like it. And I thinkshe's spot on the hustle just changed. Just keep being a good person butrealized that because people are buying self service is opposed to us trying tosell things or market things as much. It just changes the way that you puttogether content delivery. And that's my big take away. Absolutely,absolutely well, Sam, thank you so much. For all the insights that you haveshared today on another episode of banking on digital growth, I appreciateit, man. Hey, great to be with you as...

...always. It until next time be Well, dogood and wash your hands. Thank you for listening to another episode of bankingon Digital Growth with James Robert Ley. Like what you hear. Tell a friend aboutthe podcast and leave us a review on Apple podcasts, Google Podcast orSpotify and subscribe while you're there. To get even more practical andproven insights, visit www dot digital growth dot com to grab a preview ofJames Roberts bestselling book Banking on Digital Growth or order a copy rightnow for you and your team from Amazon. Inside, you'll find a strategicmarketing and sales blueprint framed around 12 key areas of focus thatempower you to confidently generate 10 times more loans and deposits untilnext time, be well and do good.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (160)