Banking on Digital Growth
Banking on Digital Growth

Episode · 5 months ago

101) #ExponentialInsights - Digital Training for Employees: Bringing Focus to the Customer Experience w/ John Findlay

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

While the COVID-19 Pandemic has encouraged the transition to digital, many still struggle to fully comprehend its importance and how to integrate it. Oversight can lead to employees unsure of how to use new technologies, resulting in a poor customer experience.

John Findlay, CEO of LemonadeLXP, joins the show to discuss the digital transformation and how companies can embrace the change and benefit.

What was talked about:

- Giving Equal Focus to New Technologies & People

- Educating Internal Teams to Improve the Customer Experience

- The Dos and Don’ts of Employee Training

- Why Attention to the Customer Experience is on the Rise

- Financial Education for the Masses

- Key Takeaways for the Listener

Check out the resources below for more information:

- John’s LinkedIn

- JFindlay@LemonadeLXP.com

 To hear more interviews like this one, subscribe to Banking On Digital Growth on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your preferred podcast platform.  

...if the employee is trained andunderstands the tech, they're going to give a better experience to thecustomer and then if we give the proper digital support tools that customer isgoing to have a better experience in learning and understanding the tech.Mhm mm. Yeah, You're listening to banking ondigital growth. With James Robert lay a podcast that empowers financial brandmarketing, sales and leadership teams to maximize their digital growthpotential by generating 10 times more loans and deposits. Today's episode ispart of the exponential insight series where James robert interviews theindustry's top marketing sales and fintech leaders sharing practicalwisdom to exponentially elevate you and your team. Let's get into the showgreetings and hello I am James robert ley and welcome to the 101st episode ofthe banking on digital growth podcast. Today's episode is part of theexponential insight series and I'm excited to welcome john Finlay to theshow, john is the ceo of eliminate L. X. P. A. Learning experience platform thathelps financial brands with the human side of digital transformation,eliminate drives customer adoption out of financial brands through technologyby transforming frontline staff and customers into digital experts. Welcometo the show, john thanks James robert, I really appreciate you having me, johnthis is gonna be fun because this is a topic that I'm really personallypassionate about digital transformation human transformation for that matterbefore we get there. What are you excited about right now? One thingpersonally or professionally it's your pick. Well I'm always excited about alot of things personally, I got a lot of hobbies, music, sports, all thatkind of stuff and big tennis player. So I'm really excited about this summertennis season. But on the professional side, you know, I'm really excitedabout this opportunity that's in front of us that the pandemics kind of forcedthis rapid acceleration of digital transformation for financialinstitutions and for other businesses for that matter. But it puts in frontof us the opportunity to push this along at a much faster rate than wewere able to before. And for us as a business, I feel we're really wellpositioned to help F. I. S. Drive that transformation among staff and a bunchof customers or members. So I'm really excited about the opportunity to helpaccelerate that and nail the customer. Remember experience throughtransformation. Absolutely. And you talk about this idea of experience andwhen I think about experience, I think about three key experiences. I thinkabout the employee experience because a positive employee experience will thenyield a positive Hx or a positive human...

...experience and that positive humanexperience can be delivered then through a positive digital experience.So E X plus Hx plus D. X equals growth. Now you believe fintech adoption orjust tech adoption for that matter is about people Not technology. I agreewith you. The focus has been too far too long on technology and not onpeople. And that's one reason 60-85% of all digital transformation projectsfail. They don't fail because the technology they felt because of peopleand people feeling confused and frustrated and overwhelmed by thetechnology, especially in financial services. So why why is that why do youbelieve Fintech adoption and technology for that matter is not about people butis about people but not about technology. Yeah, that's a greatquestion. Here's the analogy I'd make to me Digital transformation. Digitaladoption is a bit like a four x 100 relay and most often you'll seeorganizations make their big investments on the front part of theleg so they'll have a lot of effort put into the first leg which is planningand choosing a vendor or starting the development. Then there's putting a toneffort into the development side of it and then turning a putting effort intothe marketing side. So little effort is left for that final leg, That's usuallythe fastest sprinter on the track that wants to bring that thing home and ifyou don't have a good final person, final athlete on that leg, then all ofthe efforts before are going to fail. And that final leg is the human sideand it's not just about like marketing is part, but a big part of it istraining your front line and the people who are going to help drive adoption ofthat tech, they need to be fluent, they need to understand the tech deeply sothat they can both promote and support it. And that's a tricky thing to do,especially with sort of old fashioned learning systems that don't havedigital tools baked in, so they're not tooled correctly for the job. So if youdon't educate that front line staff because they're going to be theambassador's, especially in the world of financial institutions, a lot offrontline staff don't actually have to bank with their employer. So they neveruse the tech. They don't understand the tech as if they're going to promote itless the question that customer ask them a question they can't answer andthey become embarrassed. So they have to touch and feel the technology andthe way to do that is give them a risk free environment with things liketechnology simulators and demos allow them to understand it. So they becomethe ambassadors for that technology so they can promote it to customers ormembers and they can support it. And to me that's the 1st 30 m of the last 100.But then the next piece is how do you support customers? Like there's anaversion to changing how you do your banking. There's an aversion tochanging anyway that you interact with...

...the company even outside of banking. Ifyou want me to fill out my insurance application online, people get worriedabout using tech. There's an anxiety and a concern of trying something new.They don't want to make mistakes. Also they have an aversion to change. Soagain we need to give them an opportunity to test drive the tech inan environment that has no risk and you mentioned the employee experience oftenforgotten, but if the employee is trained and understands the tech,they're going to give a better experience to the customer. And then ifwe give the proper digital support tools, that customer is going to have abetter experience in learning and understanding the tech, and ultimately,that will lead to a better digital experience. As you talked about theanalogy, I'd give on that one, I'm sure you've all had the experience of beingtech, support for your parents, They call you up, they can't figure out howto do something on the computer there already frustrated because they haven'tbeen able to do whatever they're trying to do. So they're asking you to helpthem, you can't see their screen, they can't understand why you can't explainto them. So you're starting to get a little frustrated, they're alreadyfrustrated. Next thing, you know, that's a pretty crappy customerexperience. And so I think we need to give our frontline the tools that theyneed to get on the same page with the customer or the member as quickly aspossible so that you take the frustration and anxiety out of thatinteraction and make it easy and smooth for the customer who ultimately this isall about. You're right and I agree with you and that's a great analogy ofthe relay and running out of gas right at the very end because we don't havethe strength to bring it home on the human experience side of things. Allthe focus has been on technology, but then it becomes time to deploy thatthrough humanity and we burn out. We get tired and there's a lot of humanbehavior here. And you know, I can't help but think of my old days ofworking in retail. I worked at Old Navy and I was one of the very first hireswhen Old Navy came into the Houston market and we grew the number oneselling Old Navy in the entire country at the store that I was, it was thesecond round of hires and we did a lot of cells training for other Old Navy'sthey opened up. But it's almost like if you're not banking at your financialbrand where you're you're working number one, that's that's creating ablind spot because you're not able to touch see experience the digitalproducts and then two, it's like working at Old Navy but wearing a braCrombie, you know, it's there's there's almost a brand misalignment in the mindbecause we are viewing things just a little bit differently from theperception that we bring to the world. And you recently shared an article fromthe financial brand about online and mobile banking adoption. They showedthat 59% of people who still use the branch they do so because they thinkit's easier and that the digital tools...

...are too hard. But once again it's aboutbehavior modification and a behavior modification opportunity for financialbrands. So what are those opportunities here, number one to begin by educatingand empowering internal teams So that number two, they can educate andempower account holders to bank even better because I mean, let's be real,how simple is it really to drive to a branch to conduct a commoditizetransaction when it could be done literally in seconds on a mobile device?Everyone wins that way. You make me think of a lot of things. There one isimagine if if we could start fresh and there was no history of banking and sowe said to someone, you have a choice, you can go into a branch to do yourstuff or you can use this digital tool. I think the vast majority of peoplewould choose the digital tool. So what it's really about is it's aboutbreaking old habits and I think we know those die hard. So I think we have toask ourselves the people who aren't using our text. So Covid is drivenaccelerated transformation anywhere from 3 to 10 years, people are saying,but there's still a good chunk of people who aren't using our digitalplatforms to do their banking. So you ask yourself, where are those people?Well, those people are coming into our branches and they're calling ourcontact centers. So spending, doing a big media splash on nationaladvertising doesn't make any sense. Most of those people are your customersand the ones who are a good chunk of them are already using digital. So thebest place to reach, the people who aren't using it is through your frontline staff. That is the number one way. And it's the human touch, a little bitof hand holding to come to get over that sort of adoption of version thatpeople have. So I think the huge opportunity and challenge is to makesure that that front line staff is as comfortable as possible and as wellversed in also the soft skills of how to elegantly make a productrecommendation without seeming sales e and guide that customer who came intothe branch to do a transaction or who called the contact center because theyweren't sure how to do something. Can we give our frontline, the soft skillsthey need and the hard skills, the product knowledge, the ability to usethose products so that that confluence of product knowledge and soft skillsallows them to give a really smooth and seamless customer, remember experienceand guide them towards digital product. I think that's the biggest opportunityand I think the biggest failure point is not doing that with your front linebecause then there's the customer who comes into and let's say they justwanted to deposit some checks, what a tremendous opportunity to say to them,you know, how easy that would have been...

...with our mobile app and you wouldn'thave even had to stand in line so and so forth for every customer that comesin and reaches an untrained frontline staff. That's a missed conversionopportunity and with all the money that we've invested in bringing digital anddigitizing the services that we offer to customers. What a shame to drop thebaton at the last 100 m with that front line staff who could have just said, ohwow, let me show you how easy this is, right? So I think that's really thebiggest opportunity, but also the biggest failure point. You know, it'sinteresting you talk about this idea of someone coming in and we're missing theopportunity to educate, to empower, to elevate very, very practical, like thathas to be built into the culture even because I think historically speakingfinancial services has been in a very reactive state. People come in, theyask us to do something and we oblige them. We now need to take a proactivestance in their life and make the recommendations to step up because tohelp the unaware become aware and so almost very practically speaking, youknow, someone comes in with a check, we get out the mobile device, we set thatup, we show them how to do, it's going to take a little bit longer. Absolutely,it's gonna take a little bit longer for that one experience, but the overallpositivity because what is an experience? Experiences are welldefined systems and processes that have been strategically thought out appliedand optimize over a period of time, resulting in one of two things apositive or a negative emotion. And so we're number one, we need to askpermission. Do you mind if I show you that there's an even better way that wecan go about conducting this and that one word right there even is apsychological hack because otherwise, if you say, can I show you a better way,what do you mean I'm doing this wrong? So there's even better is is alreadytransforming this from a positive conversation or into a positiveconversation and then we actually just guide them and walk them through andwow, that wasn't so scary. That wasn't so bad. That was actually quite easy.And it's just these small micro winds that need to be reinforced instead ofthis massive transformation because change is hard and we've already beengoing through massive change this last, you know, 15, 18 months, but it's thesmall ideas of helping here that I see the really big opportunity. So what arethe deuce, what are the don't when it comes to training and education first,internally that can then be deployed externally. What are some of those duesand don't that financial brands should think about and consider listeningtoday. Okay, so I'm gonna work it in sort of one by one. So the first don't,I would say is a lot of financial institutions have legacy learningsystems that are not that new and...

...they're learning experience is not veryinteractive and it has a bad reputation amongst their employees, we hear it allthe time. So if you are one of those F. I. S. That has sort of an olderlearning management system that delivers static experiences, don't leanon that for your digital training. That's the first thing I would say,because already employees have an aversion to using it, you don't needtwo versions, an aversion to the tech and an aversion to learning about andyou're really stuck. So I think the first thing is you need to look for amore modern solution that's tooled properly. So in terms of what to do, Ithink so, for example, when you're trying to teach someone about your newtechnology, there's a few different things that you have to teach themfirst. You have to give them foundational knowledge and that's thestuff like one of the daily limits and what are the rules and procedures thatyou have to for using the tech and so forth. That's pretty dry stuff, whichtypically would be delivered in sort of a pdf format. People would read it,tick a box, say they read it, not really understand it. You didn'tsucceed. That stuff is where we would use a game based learning approachbecause it turns that boring stuff into something that's kind of fun. And ifyou do it right, they'll play multiple times and they'll drive thatinformation into their brains and you'll get the retention needed so thatthey can handle those, those questions from customers remembers. So that's thefirst one. The second do is you need to create walk throughs of your technologyso people can test drive it in a risk free environment, especially for thosefront liners who aren't your customers, they can't be expected to promote andsupport tech they've never used and you're not going to have them sign upto a live app, it's not going to make sense. Stuff isn't gonna work if theydon't have money in their account, the ability to do these transactions. Soyou need a simulated environment and that's going to take away their anxietybecause there's no risk, doesn't matter if I mess up, who cares? But they'llget familiar with that tech. So foundation game based learning forfoundational knowledge, then you've let them test drive the tech. The nextthing is you need to find a way for them to practice recommending it tocustomers in a risk free environment. We use interactive role playexperiences that allow, it's sort of like a virtual experience for thecustomer coming in, the challenge, the the frontline staff to give the bestpossible customer experience. It makes it fun, it makes it pressure free. Andso those to me are some crucial dues. I think the don't don't rely on statictext based experiences. You're talking about something as digital andfundamentally interactive. You're learning has to has to mirror that itcan't be read about this and be expected to support it. The other thingI think is you have to understand too, that your front line staff are in sortof high anxiety situations frequently where customers are asking themquestions, they're expected to respond...

...and think about it through the pandemicwhere many of them were sent home. I'm working from home. They don't have theshoulder to shoulder colleagues support they once enjoyed so they can't justturn to somebody and go, hey, how do you do this? So now when somebody callswith questions about your tech, their anxiety is even higher. So you need togive them tools that they can access on demand. When a customer says, how do Ido this? And that's where the technology walk throughs can be used aspart of your training, but they can also be used for supporting that frontline in live environments on demand. Hey, I don't know how to send atransfer to my kid in college. No problem. Let me pull and just go andpull up a simulator and go what screening is specifically havingtrouble with, click on it? Get to the right screen, walk them through thattransaction distress the situation for both parties. So to me, the ability totest drive the tech is a huge, huge do like it's, it's to me one of the mostimportant I think another don't is forgetting about the employeeexperience. You mentioned it earlier, James robert and you're one of the veryfew people who I hear talking about the employee experience. You hear a lotabout customer experience, my feeling about being an employer, because I amone is that we are as much a service to our employees as we are an employer.We're providing a service to them as well, and that services to help them beas good at their jobs and make their jobs as stress free and happy as we can.And so investing a little bit in making sure that your digital training is apositive experience for your staff instead of oh God, I didn't do thetraining again, like that's the least we can do when we're asking them tohelp us take a huge step in our digital transformation journey. One that by theway, many staff are feeling like might even replace them in their jobs. So Ithink you have to be mindful of all of the things, the stressors that aregoing on for your front line staff and make sure that your training addressesthe stress of having to support new tech, make the experience fun, make ita little more digestible to learn the boring stuff, but also make themrealize that as a digital savvy front liner, you're more valuable to thefinancial institution than the one who isn't. And so make everybody under makethe experience as positive as possible for employees. And it will translateinto an amazing experience for your customers and members. Technology hastransformed our world and digital has changed the way consumers shop for andbuy financial services forever. Now consumers make purchase decisions longbefore they walk into a branch, if they walk into a branch at all, but yourfinancial brand still wants to grow loans and deposits, we get it. Digitalgrowth can feel confusing, frustrating...

...and overwhelming for any financialbrand, marketing and sales leader. But it doesn't have to because James robertwrote the book that guides you every step of the way along your digitalgrowth journey, visit www dot digital growth dot com to get a preview of hisbest selling book banking on digital growth Or order a copy right now foryou and your team from Amazon inside you'll find a strategic marketingmanifesto that was written to transform financial brands and it is packed fullof practical and proven insights you can start using today to confidentlygenerate 10 times more loans and deposits. Now back to the show. Mhm Ihave been talking a lot, a lot, a lot about E. X. Or employee experienceconfession. I missed the mark when writing banking on digital growthbecause my formulaic approach was D. X. Plus H. X. Equals growth meaningdigital experience plus human experience equals growth. It becamevery clear and evident to me with covid that we needed to reformulate thatequation to include employee experience because to me that's where the lightbulb went off. I I kept hearing from from internal team members when doingsurveys and assessments that financial brands specifically. When it comes totechnology rollouts like those technology role like they're the lastpeople to know decisions are being made at the executive level. And oh by theway next week we're launching this new technology and it could be an app. Itcould be remote deposit capture what not. It could just be a new process ornew system. And so the technology changes have been coming fast and themedium I think you know Marshall McLuhan from your neck of the woodsback in the 1960s was writing about how the medium is the message. The mediumin which we communicate is actually more powerful than the messages ofwhich we communicate through them. And you're right. So doing digital trainingvia a pdf is not conveying or signaling the appropriate message to the idealaudience. In this particular case, internal team members or I've seen itas well. Financial brand launches some new technology and then they send outan email and they click to download the pdf and there's really a cognitivedisconnect with that. The other thing that I'm thinking about here is empathy.Everyone learns at a different pace. Everyone learns in a different way. Andwhen you can hit all the different learning modes through, we'll call itan optimized LMS. One that is really made for digital first delivery. Thenwe can really lean in on the perspective of E. Q. Plus A. Q. Isgreater than I. Q. Emotional intelligence plus adaptability is fargreater than just intelligence alone. So my question for you here and I seethis, I hear this when it comes to...

...training, when it comes to educationfor financial brands, why is this one of the very first things to get cut arenot even considered at all. When I truly believe in this digital world ofexponential change. Training and education is a competitive advantagefor a financial brand. But why is that why do you see training education notgetting the attention that it needs to have going forward in this post? Coviddigital world? I think that that is changing a little bit and I think it'schanging because for the first time really in their history, banks arebeing pushed by non bank competitors and there's a risk now that before,whatever, if if the customer experience isn't that great, I mean, the worstthing is I might lose a few customers to the, to the other financialinstitution down the block, but now I'm gonna lose them to the local grocerystore and I'm going to lose our, the national grocery store, I'm going tolose them to Apple to Paypal, to you, name it. Right? So I think a 1000 cuts.Yeah, exactly, that's it. So I think we're seeing f i is look and go, youknow what, we do actually have to focus on our customer, Remember experience. Ithink banks even have to start looking at how credit unions operate in theirsort of member first approach and delivering that through human beingsand through great experiences. And so, yep, training has been one of thosethings that gets cut, but I think that might be changing a little bit, but Ithink it largely was cut because quite frankly, historically, once you have acustomer, you've got him for life and I think now losing a customer isn't, it'snot a, oh, I'm choosing to change banks, I'm going to take all my stuff and goto a new bank. Uh it's oh I downloaded the Apple Pay thing on my phone andnext thing you know, you're using Apple Pay and I was like, well, did you knowthis credit cards easier at all? Uh and it's a gradual erosion of that customeras they started with one financial institution than their part with oneand part with the next. And if you're not adding value to that experience,the next guy's going to gradually take that customer from you. And so that'swhere I think it's going to change. And these behaviors that you're talkingabout, you know, really through digital transformation that leads to digitaladoption that leads to digital growth. I also believe they can be deployedfrom a financial health, a financial well being a financial coachingperspective because that is another area that we've been focused aroundover here. You know, we've got all of this data available we probably knoware account holders, personal lives spending habits, spending behaviorsbetter than they know themselves...

...because a lot of spending issubconscious were not even aware of what we're doing at the time ofpurchase. Some I mean even even for example, like the Starbucks Cup, youknow, Starbucks has made it so easy to to they've eliminated the barrier oftransaction and have gamified it on their end to where you get the littlestars and you get the cup of coffee and whatnot. But taking a proactive stancewould also create value for account holders and as a result create valuefor the financial brand here. What do you think about training when you thinkabout education in financial services? What is a commonly held belief thatothers might have that you just disagree with? I don't know if it's abelief others have, but I think that it is a huge failure that our educationsystem produces kids who know oceans about english literature or whateverand very little about how to manage their personal finances. I think it's atremendous failure combine that with the fact that many of them are comingout of school with enormous debt, yet no understanding of how to manage that.So I think the maybe the myth is that we're all capable of handling our ownfinances, but I think the truth of the matter is we aren't, and we need toeducate people and there's lots of great tech out there that's helpingenrich the banking experience, like the guys that moving are doing that,there's a number of other technologies that are trying to help you understandthat. And I think that's a great service. You imagine a situation whereyour financial institution is able to look at, okay, here's the size of yourdebt, here's your financial picture. So here's reasonably what you can affordas a home or has a car or for whatever the things you want. Typically you goin, you ask for a mortgage, they get your information, they say you don'tqualify, you qualify for this much of a mortgage, but there's no back story,Right? You know, so you're like, I can't afford the house, I want a damn.But it would sure be nice to be saying, well, here's how it all maps out. Yes.And you know, here's some of the changes you could make. If you want tosay, I'm not going to drive an $80,000 car, then that's going to put you intoa house. It's a little bit bigger if that's where your values lie. But Ithink that financial literacy and find it into that leads to financialwellness has been a missing part of the equation for a long time. You know,it's funny you mention that and I agree, I see that I go and volunteer inschools and I bring, you know, an entrepreneurial perspective as part oflike career day and that just alone is a whole new area. There's researchcoming out now that is showing financial literacy by itself withoutcontext, without coaching is actually doing more harm than good because itcreates a pseudo sense of confidence. Like, oh, I read this article or I, youknow, watch this video so I know about...

X, Y or Z, and that's not the reality,and people are getting themselves into trouble because it's pseudo confidenceand I think health care is a great analogy, it's like, you can go togoogle and you can google your symptoms and misdiagnosed yourself, that's whyyou still end up at the doctor, even though you freak yourself out with allof your possible symptoms and diagnosis, you want to go in. I really believe thesame is true, and we're seeing that on the health side. Like, for example, theapp noon new muses psychology to build new habits and to crush goals. It helpspeople stop dieting, to get lifelong results. And people have reallytransformed their life by an app, and it helps to create that accountabilitymeasure. But I truly believe being held accountable by another human being thatis then supported further by technology. That's where the biggest opportunity isfor growth, john this has been a fantastic conversation. I got one lastquestion for you here because I always like to end and send the dear listeneroff with something very practical, very specific. Because as we've been talkingabout all transformation begins with a small micro step, small microcommitment ford. What is that one thing that they can think about, number oneand number two apply to begin to make progress on their journey here today. Ithink for me from my where I come from, it's to put a deliberate focus on thehuman side of the digital transformation journey and that humanfocus extends from not just you know, the people developing your tech, it'smaking sure that you support every person who is going to be expected toeither promote or use that technology. And if you can nail their experience,nail the frontline experience, nailed the customer, remember experience yourdigital transformation, odds of success have gone up dramatically. And so againI go back to the analogy, the human side is that last leg of the race Putsome focus there, just like the four x 100 team does and put your fastestrunner there because that's what's going to bring it home. Yeah. Putpeople at the center of all of your thinking, all of your doing and notjust people externally. I really believe the E. X. Has to proceed the C.X. The employee experience has to proceed the customer experience. Andthere was an article in Forbes that mentioned that and I think aboutfrontline here because this was what they were looking at, that individualsbecome comfortable with a set of routines and in many cases resistchange. In fact, in an analysis of several surveys that totaled 100,000responses, Only 22% of front line...

...employees surveyed Like to leave theircomfort zone. Put another way, 78% of front line employees, please don't movemy cheese. And if we're going to move their cheese, we can do it. And a fun,educational, engaging n game ified way that goes beyond the traditional LMS orthe pdf and really creates positive behaviors that are linked to positiveemotions through Gamification. That's awesome. Can I tell one quick story tofinish up? Absolutely. Prior to this business, I was a software trainer. SoI trained middle management and up to use S. A. P. And this was back in thelast century showing my gizzard. Um But it was awful. It was uh I was aninstructor led training guy. I'd go in with a power point slide and tell themabout S. A. P. And how it worked. Everybody in the room hated it. Andthey were largely distracted when on those days on their Blackberrys and oneday I had an idea I decided I asked if I could have two computers in the roombecause they didn't have computers in the room back then and just broke theminto two teams and said, look I'm gonna help you do a transaction on a systemtask on on S. A. P. And I'm here to help you. But you guys figure it out.1st 12 finish wins. Well, these people went from hating it too coming up to meafter this this session going, that was that was the most fun training sessionwe've had. And here they were touching the technology they didn't want tolearn because really it was more about can they beat their colleagues? And sothat's what it's about. It's about understanding that listening to medrone on about a tech they're not familiar with is a crappy humanexperience, but actually touching and feeling it in a little bit ofcompetition and you've got your other colleagues helping you figure it out.It was kind of fun. Yes, absolutely. Because it changes the environment andwhen you transform the environment as dr Benjamin Hardy has written in hisbook, Willpower doesn't work. If we want to create consistent change andtransformation that sticks, we sometimes have to transform theenvironment because the environmental pool is simply just too strong andthat's exactly what you did. It's a great story, john if anyone islistening, they have questions, they want to continue the conversation thatwe started today. What is the best way for them to reach out? Say hello,connect with you. Oh, hit me up on linkedin if you like. Or email me at J.Finley, which is J F I N D E L A Y at lemonade, L X P dot com. Yeah, hit meup. I'm happy to chat. Happy to answer any questions. Yeah, connect with johnlearned from john john thank you so...

...much for joining me on another episodeof Banking on digital growth James robert. Thanks so much for having me. Ireally appreciate it as always. And until next time be well. Do good andmake your bed. Thank you for listening to another episode of Banking ondigital growth with James robert. Ley. Like what you hear, tell a friend aboutthe podcast and leave us a review on apple podcasts, google podcasts orSpotify and subscribe while you're there. To get even more practicalimprovement insights, visit www dot digital growth dot com to grab apreview of James, roberts, best selling book banking on digital growth or ordera copy right now for you and your team from amazon inside you'll find astrategic marketing and sales blueprint framed around 12 key areas of focusthat empower you to confidently generate 10 times more loans anddeposits until next time, be well and do good.

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