Banking on Digital Growth
Banking on Digital Growth

Episode · 1 year ago

90) #ExponentialInsights: Digital Growth Rocket Fuel: 7 Steps to a Content-First Business

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Content is the fuel in your digital growth engine.

If you maximize your content, then you maximize your future digital growth potential.

In this episode, I speak with Joe Pulizzi, Founder at The Tilt and Author of Content Inc., and he shares his step-by-step approach to crafting the highest-octane content around.

What we talked about:

- Why it’s more important to build an audience than a product

- Why you need to start simple and then expand

- The 7 steps to crafting high-octane content

- Why every financial brand is a publisher, whether they know it or not

You can find this interview and many more by subscribing to Banking on Digital Growth on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or here.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Banking on Digital Growth in your favorite podcast player.
 

...there's a better way to launch a new product inside a company or to launch a new business and thats build the audience first figure out an audience that has some unmet needs, solve those pain points through consistently delivered information and then once you do that, just listen to them, they will absolutely tell you what they're willing to purchase. Mhm. Mhm. Right. You're listening to banking on digital growth. With James robert lay a podcast that empowers financial brand marketing sales and leadership teams to maximize their digital growth potential by Generating 10 times more loans and deposits. Today's episode is part of the exponential insight series where James robert interviews the industry's top marketing sales and fintech leaders, sharing practical wisdom to exponentially elevate you and your team. Let's get into the show greetings and hello, I am James robert, ley and welcome to the 90th episode of the Banking on digital Growth podcast. Today's episode is part of the exponential insight series and I'm excited to welcome joe policy to the show. Joe has founded four companies including the digital content news site, the tilt as well as the Content Marketing Institute. In 2014, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Content Council and his podcast series. This old marketing with robert Rose has millions of downloads from over 150 countries. Joe is also the amazon best selling author of content inc killing marketing and UP content marketing, which was named a must read business book by Fortune magazine. And now, after all of that, joe has released the second edition of Content inc, which is exactly what we're gonna be talking about today as I shared many times before. Content is the fuel of the digital growth engine and with content, inc joe provides a step by step approach for financial brands to maximize the value of their content and as a result maximized their future digital growth potential. Welcome to the show, joe Well, James, thank you so much for having me. I feel um I feel excited and we're gonna talk a little bit of content. Get into some discussion about how banks can make this. Are you banks, all financial institutions who we're talking to? We're talking financial brands as a whole. So when you think about that, we have banks, we have credit unions, Fintech, neo, awesome challenger banks. So that's why we look at the umbrella here of financial brands before we get into that. I always like to start this on a positive note about just something that you're excited about personally or professionally. Well, personally, we mentioned this before the show, I've got two teenage boys that are going off to college uh the pandemic sort of mixed things up because we were supposed to have one go off last year, one go this year didn't quite work that way. We're going to have both go at the same time in the fall. So fingers crossed that that actually happens. Well, you're you're a little bit further down the road because we've got, we've got 10, 86 and four. So they're going to be right there back to back to back very soon. Spacing. That's impressive facing. It was definitely, definitely, definitely was planned playing that way. So they're going off to school. That's big news coming off the school. We're going to be empty nesters. So we'll see how that my wife and I, so we've been looking forward to this for a long time. We'll see, we'll see how it goes. We actually, we did have a lot of travel planned a few years ago. We had to cancel for obvious reasons. So maybe we'll get back out there and do that and then uh you know, we'll talk about some of the, some of the work stuff, some of the career stuff I, you know, a couple years ago I...

...took a full sabbatical, I took a full year off after selling content marketing institute and now I'm and a lot of cases because of the pandemic, I'm back into it. I felt that there needs to be more focused on helping content creators, which is why we came out with content ink again, which is why we launched the tilt and then my love and passion from a philanthropic standpoint is Orange Effect Foundation, my wife and I've been doing that for Jeez almost 15 years now, we're basically, we, we fundraise to help kids who need speech therapy, who have speech disorders get the speech therapy they need and that's kind of our our passion project. So a lot a lot of stuff going on James and uh we can talk about some of it. Well I gotta appreciate that because it's funny that I'm doing a podcast and do a lot of speaking. But as a child actually went through speech therapy, I really did, I really did, obviously worked. It did and I'll tell you the fascinating thing. Um even about two years ago I actually had my tongue clipped because it was still creating some problems my speech pathology And worked with the speech pathologist. And so this has been kind of a continuous, ongoing journey of growth in this particular area. So grateful for the work that you're doing with your wife and the philanthropy in that area. And you know, I mean it was easy, easy decision. I mean, my my oldest who's now 19, He didn't have any verbal words when he was three years old. So aggressive speech and play therapy for 56 years and now he's fantastic. He do whatever he wants to do, and that's all we're trying to do. And what I didn't realize there's a lot of families can't afford speech therapy insurance doesn't cover, you know, a lot of the details, but most people don't when you have to decide between putting food on the table and speech therapy, you put food on the table. So when in a gun that comes back to a lot of what we talk about here with financial brands, that the work you're doing is much bigger than. So its purpose driven. It's it's it's framed around creating value for much more than just yourself, for your family. But it's you're you're taking this to a much larger audience and and you know, you you talked about you took a sabbatical, you got back into it. You open up content, inc nine powerful words that hooked me, drew me in right off the bat. You wrote the model described in this book, saved my life. Let's start the conversation there. Because I think why did it save your life? How did it save your life? Well, first of all, thank you for reading the first page of the book. Alright, I read I read it all well, thank you. It was, you know, so to go back to 2007, I was I was working for a large media company. I had an executive position. Things were good, but I always had an inch to start a company. Had to talk with my wife And I said, I really think, you know, of course she knew about this for a long time and she was on me about are you going to make the decision or not? And then in March of 2007, I said, Okay, I'm gonna do it. Made the decision left, and we had to change things around and figure things out. And I had this amazing idea for this matching digital matching product that I thought would be great. We were going to be the harmony for content marketing, that's how we were pitching it. And I thought it was the greatest thing ever and accept that nobody bought it and it didn't work out very well. And in 2000 and passed for two years from there in 2009, I'm ready to walk away like this is not working. I didn't even tell anybody, but I was actually looking for a job and trying to find somebody to hire me. We had no money, we were in debt. I had two small kids, I'm like this is not going to work. And then finally, For whatever reason, after...

...feeling sorry for myself, I started look looking at the feedback from my blog subscribers at the time because I started a blog thankfully in 2007 about content marketing was called the content revolution and I'm trying to pitch them a product of this e harmony matching thing and what they were asking for is joe is are there any events that I could go to so I can network with people that are dealing with content issues. Joe is there do you do consulting joe? Is their small workshops we can get joe. Is there any online training for content marketing? All these questions that they were asking, saying that they were going to buy stuff from us but we didn't offer those things. So basically did the pivot from that moment on. And so this is September 2009. I remember I wrote it on a cocktail napkin and I said we are going to change everything going content marketing all the way we're going to create the leading online destination for content marketing, which became Content Marketing Institute. We can create the leading magazine and content marketing, Chief Content Officer magazine, which we created in january the next year. And then we're going to create the largest in person event in the world For content marketing called Content Marketing World. And my goal was to accomplish all those things by 2013 and believe it or not, James, we ended up doing all those by 2012. And the model that saved us back to your original conversation is luckily we built this audience of loyal subscribers and like we had sort of, as just happened happened to as we were creating, creating all this blog content And we built this audience of 10,000 plus. And so instead of pushing this product down their throats that they didn't want to buy, all I did was just start listening to those thousands of subscribers and they told us exactly what they would buy, shape the model around it. And we had a wonderful, amazing exit in 2016 and all our financial dreams came true and it was because we built a loyal audience focused on the content niche, focused on a very particular who and it all came together. And I think that right, there is a really what I would call a contrarian point of view, you know, I even you wrote about this about Peter thiel and you know, you and you you had this experience, you built this product and you went to go look for people and I see a lot of financial brands do the same thing. Even Fintech, they build the product and then they try to find the audience to match the product. And so this contrarian approach, I know it's gonna confuse and perplex, perplex many financial brand leaders who have taken this, you don't agree with it. Number one, what's the problem with this legacy? Thinking of what we'll just call it, putting the product first, particularly in this post, Covid digital world, and then what's the optimal path forward beyond just pushing and promoting product here? Well, it's just so weird, we think that there's one way to start a business and that's product lead. And as I've been doing research on this audience first model, which will, will unpack a little bit, uh realize that, oh my gosh, okay, all these companies are creating these products and there's such a high failure rate. I mean in three years, more than 50% of these product led initiatives fail. I'm like, okay, that's, that's interesting. You get everybody including peter feel and every other product business startup guru out there saying, oh, well, this is great. Just create an unbelievable product and everything will work out, but it doesn't. And so, and by the way, it's really risky and really expensive and really time consuming and you're like, okay, well this, there's got to be a better way and that's where We...

...started. So probably by in 2014, I started interviewing these companies who created an audience first Model, which is basically they build an audience whether that's an email newsletter, a podcast, a blog, Youtube series, Ticktock, whatever the cases. They built a loyal audience. And then after 9, 12, 18 months, they start to monetise that audience in different ways. And then after 24 months, they diversified into other areas. And then in five years, generally what we find out is these startups and I know we'll talk about financial brands, but in this case the startup, five years, $5 million valuation seems fairly regular thing and they don't have the high start up costs that you do when you create a new product. And I thought that we were on to something like this can't be a thing right there. They're like, why are more people thinking about this? But we just change takes so long. People don't think that there's actually a different way to do it. So that's why I've been out on this, you know, marathon podcasting tour, I'm doing a book tour coming up. I'll tell anyone who will listen to me saying, I think there's a better way to launch a new product inside a company or to launch a new business. And thats build the audience, first figure out an audience that has some unmet needs, solve those pain points through consistently delivered information. And then once you do that, just listen to them, they will absolutely tell you what they're willing to purchase. And I would say the same for any financial brand out there. Figure out that that core customer base or the peace of the customer base that you really want to affect in some way and maybe you have an idea for what that product should be. But I wouldn't launch the product had focused on solving those needs so that they rely on you every day every week, every month with whatever information they become loyal to your information on an ongoing basis, and then you talk to them and then you launch your product and then it's a raging success because why don't you build a loyal audience? You can sell them whatever you want. And that right there, that is the big, transformative perspective, build the audience first, not the product, and it's an acronym that I teach go all in on whatever it is that we're doing here asking, listening and learning because people are going to tell you, inform you and it's going to take time. But I want to address this because there's a lot of misconceptions when it comes to content, specifically in the financial services space, A lot of fear, I can think about how are we going to focus? We're trying to do all of this for everyone. We don't have clarity of who we really need to zone in on what, what might be at a macro level. And then we'll move into the content inc model here for financial brands. But when we think about financial services, financial brands, what is a common belief that others might have about content marketing for financial brands that you just passionately disagree with? Well, the one, I don't know if I'm answering this precisely, but I've heard this specifically from financial brands, because I'll go in and they'll say, here's the audience were targeting. We're targeting consumers of X to X age with these general pain points and personas and whatever, and they'll say, great, what do we do here? And I say you can't do anything there because you can't be the leading informational expert about anything to that broader group of people. So you have to mix it up a little bit more. So, uh, I I just use this one that's on my mind is a little bit different than financial, but we can get to more financial examples, but somebody has in manufacturing said, I target plant...

...managers. I said, your target plant managers. I said, can you be the leading informational expert in anything to plant managers? And they're thinking like, no, I'm like, okay, well what if it's plant managers who work in companies that are 10,000 people or more? Could you do that? Like, maybe what about plant managers who work in large companies that outsource specifically to India and china? Could you be the leading exponent? He's maybe I'm like, okay, you're getting close, that's the type of exercise that I want to do. So if I'm on the financial side and I'm looking at, like I said, I'm targeting institutions. I'm targeting institutions. I'm targeting institutions of what size institutions, where in the world, institutions that have, what particular pain points? What keeps those people up at night? How are those needs different than any other needs that are out there? And then you get to a point and unique yourself down so much that you can say yes, joe. I think I can actually be the leading expert in that content area to that group of people. I said now we got something. I'm going to always go bigger. You can never go small. I'm gonna put my yes, you can always go bigger. You can never go smaller. That right there. Key insight, key takeaway. I'm gonna put my ceo hat on because I hear this having the same types of conversations. But joe what about everyone else who's not in this niche segment? Like can we still help them? Can we still serve them or are we missing something? Is is it a mindset block that's getting in our way with this type of thinking. It's funny just because you market to a certain group of people don't it doesn't mean that you can't serve everyone. Like if you like I just I actually just 20 minutes ago got done talking with the consultant and he was he was saying, well if I market to this group of people, what if somebody in this industry wants my services? I said well fine, that's your decision. You can take those services, you can take that job. We're talking about marketing, we're talking about positioning you as the leading expert in something. It has nothing to do. You can still service half the world if you want to. But we're talking about where you feel because if you're choosing the market to a certain group of people in a certain way, you feel there's an opportunity there competitive advantage for some reason. Well, good, let's focus on that. But if somebody else wants to open a checking account with you, great, fine take it. I don't care. And that right there is, I think another key insight and learning to take away is just because you market and you niche down your marketing, messaging your positioning your content around a specific group segment, niche of people or an audience doesn't mean that you cannot help anyone else that falls outside of this. This is critically important for financial brands, particularly community institutions, even thin tech that don't have, say, the capitals of the Bank of America's and the Chases of the world, Who can go out, I mean, you know, chase $2.5 billion dollar marketing budget. I'm a community institution that's two billion in assets. Well, I'm gonna have to be very smart with where I'm putting my time, effort and energy, which brings us into the content inc model here. Seven steps that I'd like to just unpacked together with you briefly for the dear listener, we've got the sweet spot number one, The Content Tilt # two, the base number three audience building, number four revenue, number five, diversify number six cell or go big number seven. Let's dive into the first step. What is the sweet spot? And how might financial brands find this? It's a great segue of what we're talking about right here with like niche ng down. Sure, absolutely. And what I love the first three of these seven, it's before you create any piece of content. And I want to make this clear because most financial organizations that...

...create any kind of content marketing, they generally just start creating stuff and they don't go through any kind of strategic process and this is all we're doing. We're going through strategic process and we're going to ask some of the hard questions about whether or not we should be doing this or not because in a lot of cases James, we'll get out of a meeting, I'll get out of a discovery meeting with, let's say, a financial burden CMO at a financial brand and they'll decide not to do something which is completely fine. If you say no that you are not going to do this video series, that might be a really good thing. The world probably doesn't need another video series. Broad video series about what we're going to solve your financial challenges. Let's let's think a little bit harder about this. So we start with the sweet spot. Sweet spot is the intersection of what you, as an organization have proficiency and what's your expertise? What's your skill level? What are you good at? What do you have any kind of authority to communicate on? And then on the other side it's your audiences desire, what are their pain points? What keeps them up at night? And the, those two things come together and you come up with some kind of basic mission statement, you're going to deliver daily financial information to institutions that are getting into Cryptocurrency, right? Whatever. Okay, great, that's fine. Everyone starts with a sweet spot. Nobody does the content tilt. That's the important part. The content tilt is what can you do that will differentiate you from everybody else out there. Right. Let's uh, type in financial services into google, type in your keyword into google and then look at what you're creating and what your competitive competitors are creating. And I guarantee you probably won't be able to see the difference. Like what are you really differentiating yourself with the content you create? And here's a really challenging statement and so I don't want to offend anybody, but let's just say you took all your content and all the information, all the videos, and blogs and podcasts and everything you do for your customers, You put it in a box and ship it away. Do your customers even notice? Will your customers notice? The answer sadly is they won't, you're not making an impact on them? And that's where the content tilt is so important is you have to figure out why is it worth your customers tied for them to avert their attention from netflix and google and everything else going on to pay attention to what you have. So the content is the most important part of this technology has transformed our world and digital has changed the way consumers shop for and buy financial services forever. Now, consumers make purchase decisions long before they walk into a branch. If they walk into a branch at all, but your financial brand still wants to grow loans and deposits, we get it. Digital growth can feel confusing, frustrating and overwhelming for any financial brand, marketing and sales leader, but it doesn't have to because James robert wrote the book that guides you every step of the way along your digital growth journey, visit www dot digital growth dot com to get a preview of his best selling book banking on digital growth or order a copy right now for you and your team from amazon inside you'll find a strategic marketing manifesto that was written to transform financial brands and it is packed full of practical and proven insights you can start using today To confidently generate 10 times more loans and deposits. Now back to the show what we're saying as a financial brand. How is that different? What value are are we creating? What's our unique perspective, the tilt, the angle that we're bringing to bear? Because once again, a great exercise, anyone who's listening can do this, go to your website, copy and paste some of just...

...your product pages, copy and paste that into a word doc, copy and paste your competitors into a word doc to remove all branding elements. How different are they? Really? And that's the, that's just from a product positioning now. It's okay. Well how can we transform that thinking to go beyond? Because if you think about financial services, all verticals have been commoditized in some shape, form or fashion because of google but financial services, a checking account checking account of mortgages and mortgage credit card as a credit card. This to me is where we have to become very clear of first and foremost, that sweet spot then the content tilt because the next thing that comes into play as you mentioned, which is building the base or building the audience. And that's to me is one of my favorite cause this is where things start to become more tangible that we can touch, grasp, see, understand. Not so theoretical. So let's talk about that. How can a financial brand begin to build the base here? So you've got your, you got your audience, you have some idea of how you're going to differentiate and then you're going to figure out what your home, what's your platform where most Companies, most financial organizations, they say well, just because we can maybe we should, maybe we should do the podcast and the email newsletter and the blog and the Webinar series and the in person event series. And, and every, you know, an average, if you look at the research, an average larger brand does between 14 and 16 different content activities. So that just becomes a mess. Not that's exhausting and you know what, it doesn't work. What does work? You start with one, you start with the leading podcast to that audience in your industry. You start with the most amazing blog. You start with this incredible youtube series. You do like use the bank in Scandinavia. They do a fantastic views Cobank tv and they decided just to do a television station, they're actually one of the number one financial education stations and it's it's a bank. So these are the types of things that you focus on and just do that and why is that? Because you can't be uh master of everything at once. If you look at how every great media brand, every great content brand in the world was developed. They always started with one thing, Red Bull Media House, That's great, that's a great example of how they start with a print magazine, Huffington Post. Great, they've got 400 different blogs. How did they start with one blog to one audience ted talks series? Oh my God, they're everywhere, they get videos all over how they start with one event in person event. This is how it starts build your audience one way one platform, then you can move on and grow audience, but you don't do everything at one time, I can't help but hear dan Sullivan, who's been a guest on this podcast in the back of my mind over a strategic coach, he always talks about the need to simplify before we multiply and and it really comes down to this idea of one. And you mentioned the example over in Scandinavia, I'm also thinking of Frost Bank out of texas and they're building a platform called Opt for optimism because they've done their own research. They've partnered, I think it was with the University of texas and what they found is that optimist actually do financially better than pessimist and so they have found that there's so much mindset work and I know, you know when reading continent, you, one of your early books that you read, that kind of started on this path, this journey was napoleon Hill, think and grow rich, so much mindset work that comes into play. And opt for Optimism is a content platform that Frost Bank is building around this particular subject matter here, Let's move on to step five, where I know the ceos that are listening in, their CFO...

...counterparts are going to be very happy because this is now about monetization using content to generate revenue. What are some of those opportunities to monetize content? So if you're a, let's say, a traditional financial brand, you've got four that I would call content marketing revenue streams. Generally you say, okay, well if I build an audience, I can sell more products. Great. If I build this loyal audience, I can sell more services. Okay, that's too, you could say, well, if I Deliver them something on a regular basis, could I create more loyal customers? That's the traditional content marketing. That's your John Deere. The Furrow magazine started in 1895. Why do they do that? Why do people that receive that still want to get by John Deere equipment? Great. That's loyalty. And then my favorite for financial brands is grow better customers create higher yield. One of my favorite case studies is TD Ameritrade has a magazine called think Money magazine, which goes to heavy traders and they did, you know when they, when they first went to the emergency first bought this magazine from I think think or swim, when they bought think or swim, they got this magazine called Think Money. They don't know what to do with it. And it took them two years to find the data. And what they found out was those traders that read that magazine ended up trading five times more than those that didn't read it, create better customers. So those are the four general ways to drive revenues. And then by the way, if you haven't noticed brands of all sizes are actually driving revenue like media companies with. so they're selling ongoing training, paid training opportunities are running events like, uh, hopefully Dream Forest will come back from Salesforce. But Sales, Salesforce's Dream Force was almost a billion dollar entity in and of itself from evaluation standpoint from a technology company creating an event that's just as valuable. If you look at somebody like a Red Bull media house, if you say, okay, what's more valuable Red Bull media house or Red Bull, I can't answer that question. They're both worth millions and millions of dollars. So you've got events and advertising and sponsorship and subscriptions and donations and all those types of things. Well, what I would focus on is what ultimately at the end of the day, what's going to make the most of the business Probably in your case, James for financial brands. You're looking at products, services, loyal customers are better customers and it could be a combination of all of those. Yeah. You know, you talk about the event and the podcast, how some of the sorts to fit together I think of messiah savings bank out of maine. They've built a platform called Fast Forward Main. It's an event that they bring all these small local businesses together that the bank is hosting the party and they're empowering, they're educating all of these small businesses and then they're supporting that in person of it. Well it was in person and then it went virtual and the virtual event actually performed far better than the end person of it. It brought more attendees to the table and then they have a content to continue to support these ongoing efforts. And so it almost creates this on it's like a flywheel. Once you get the will turning, that's the hardest part. You think about spin spin class, in cycling, it's hard to get the wheel turning, but once the wheel turning it it creates its own momentum correct? Well, what the amazing thing is even though content initiatives start with one revenue path, it generally ends up to be 56 or seven different ones, you end up looking like an amazon or like an apple that drives or Disney that drives so many different revenue opportunities. And I think what we need to keep in mind games is that we're all publishers, all financial brands or publishers, it's just some r I don't believe it, some believe it,...

...some don't believe it, you're in denial, that's fine. But every one of us can published today, every one of us is publishing today and you actually want to make an impact and drive revenue or not, that's the decision you need to make. Absolutely That that idea of Of multiple channels diversification brings us to step six. You know I think my child savings bank, they have their their in person event virtual event podcast. What are some of the diversification that we can think about once we gain that competency in the starting? Because it's not about eating the elephant, it's about taking that first bite. Where are the diversification opportunities? Future thinking here. Yeah. So I mean just from what we did at C. M. I. It's the natural path that we started with a blog in a blog that we just did for 20 months. And then once we did that blog we launched the magazine And then after nine months, 12 months after that. Then we launched the event then another year and a half after that we launched a podcast and then we launched a webinar program. We launched our research series. So basically you create a media empire if you will and you go from step to step two step. That the important thing is you still have to build that base first. You can't diversify too quickly. And that's what scares me because we can do all this, we can publish everything. But you get all these brands and say, oh it's just diversify all. I want to do it all at once. That does not work. You have to wait a little bit generally after the base. You gotta wait about 12 to 18 months for this thing to really work. But then you can really diversify. Sony's got a really interesting program that they have called Alpha Universe, where they started with just a blog. And then they said, okay, well then we're going to do some in person, in person events for photographers. We're going to do that and then we're gonna do a podcast and then they did that. Those are all step by step by step. And then they launched their own online training program. I can see a financial brand doing the same thing. I mean, you know, you could talk better than I could about the amount of financial training that's going on on a consumer and an institution side, the opportunities there for paid and unpaid. That it's just crazy. It's paid and unpaid because from my viewpoint of the world, you have content, you build this base and then so you got financial education, financial literacy. But from what we have found through our research that is actually probably doing more harm than good, because it gives people a pseudo confidence that, oh, I read this stuff online. I know and money is inherently has a high cognitive load, It's extremely complex. There's a lot of financial shame that holds people back from achieving their full potential in life. And so to me, the next level up in financial services is actually around what I call financial coaching, so that you have content and a coach that actually hold someone accountable, but they can continue to provide that training, that education and it creates this upward spiral that can be group. So maybe it's, it's more of a community of sorts. If you will, it can become paid to where you might have an annual review with a financial coach. The financial jim. Actually, out of new york is already working around this type of practice and principle. They're not a financial institution, but the same thinking can be brought internally, which then creates value and it, and it comes back to your point, product, service loyalty, higher yield deeper level relationships. And as things continue to grow, that brings the steps seven, which is to sell or go big in this particular case, you know, most likely I see a financial institution probably doubling down or they could potentially sell off a content asset and you create value that way. Yeah, you absolutely could. But I agree with you. I think this is where you get to the point saying, okay, are we really going to take this seriously? We really gonna go big and the opportunity right now. And you know, I talked about a lot in the book is if...

I'm a financial brand, I'm starting to pick off smaller blogs, podcast, media properties, short magazines, events and buy them. Uh, this is the opportunity and marketing that nobody talks enough about, but it is absolutely happening. I just talked to three of my podcast or friends that absolutely said that they would sell and I had one that just sold just sold to a larger brand. This is happening right now whether you want to believe it or not. And we just talked about how much patience and how much effort it takes to build this whole content, inc strategy thing. So you might be saying maybe you have some, maybe maybe don't spend that advertising program, maybe take that money and buy a podcast by a blog, by a website with domain authority, by a mini event. Those types that target the customers that you're trying to target because it's absolutely working well. And that's I grew up in publishing James and that's what I learned. Marketers want to create everything organically first. If you're a publisher, you always look to buy first and that is the difference and that is where you know, to shortcut some of this learning for the dear listener Fin con expo dot com tab is community. You can go to Youtube, Youtubers and podcasters and it's a list that they've compiled and aggregated for individuals who have already or who are already building their own audiences, their own platforms and make them an offer if it's something. So for example, I can think of a financial brand who might want to target the busy mom and that's an important market right there because we know from research, it's the female that typically controls the household finances, manages the household finances. And so when you can tap into that, who's already working in that sphere of influence, will shortcut that learning and then just go and buy those assets by those resources. And it's a win win, win, win for the financial brand went for the influencer and win for the end consumer, that busy mom because you'll be able to tap in and continue to create exponential value. Well, that's what you said is important. What who's the, who, who were trying to target, who already targets that group really well. What are they doing? And are they for sale And you make your little list like you have and I have mine to make a little cheat sheet list of. I'd love to have that website, I'd love to have that event whatever and you just slowly over time approached them. I mean this is just M and A. Is is this what what, this is what publishers do and I think that is a huge opportunity. I've got a good friend of mine runs the program in a row. Electronics are electronics is a fortune 1, 20 company, $24 billion in revenue. Last year they bought 55 0 different brands and now they are the largest media company in the B two B electronics industry. And they did so over a three year process by buying companies and by the way each one of those are profitable in and of themselves and then also sell more products and services. I think it's beautiful. It really is. A lot of people don't do it and I can't help but think you know and you mentioned this a couple times before talking through the seven steps of the content. Eek model is thinking marketing, transforming their mindset beyond thinking of just marketing from the traditional sense of ads and buys. But taking on that publisher first that media first mentality what's a recommendation you can make to maybe begin to transform some of that thinking of how they view themselves because you talked about denial. How can we overcome that? So this is a this is a very tough exercise that you can do with your your team. So you have to prepare yourself before you do it. But it absolutely works. Everything is about digital experiences today. That's how most of your customers interact with us. Even we see even with banks, right, you don't go...

...into a bank much anymore. You're in, you're you're engaging online and digital experience in some way. So let's take a look. Let's do an audit of your digital experiences. How do let's look at your website. Let's look at your blog. Let's look at your podcast. Let's look at your e newsletter that probably nobody in the company reads. But let's look at it anyways and do that audit. And you and I would recommend an outside organization doing it. But if you want to do it inside cost you nothing. You just have to be honest about your two. And I've done it a couple times. And what you realize is most of your marketing team doesn't really know what's going on in different parts of the organization at all. This content is going out. The sales team generally doesn't know and it's lackluster at best, especially the email newsletters. The email newsletters are terrible. And that is your first line of defense. You're sending out emails on going to all your customers and it's bad. You're probably already considered spam. So we have some work to do. And I think that's where you start to get together. And you realize, look, if if we're a digital content company, which every financial brand is and this is how we present ourselves. It's just like we used to think if Mcdonald's golden arches were falling down, that's what's happening with our content right now. So let's fix it now. And I think that's what I want to leave on. There's a lot that we've talked about. There's a lot that we've talked through. I'm always about one quick win, some micro behavior, something practical, something actionable. That the dear listener can take apply to get some courage to get some conference to continue to explore this methodology that you've unpacked now for a second time with continent coming back out. What would that one thing you could recommend to the dear listener make that one action to just begin to make some progress forward on this journey here. I would question who you're sending your communications to and just take the couple weeks to go through. For example, make a list. Let's say you send an email newsletter. Who is that email news that are really going to? Is it niche enough? Is it really, really doing honest? And I like I like to start with the email because what financial brands have generally done so well is they end up getting a lot of personal data and personal information. And at some point you're going to get a lot of our customer base is because the customer bases that are going to revolt because we're not respecting that relationship by sending quality consistent information. So an easy place to start is with that email newsletter. So don't do the full audit that we talked about a second ago. Let's just start with that email newsletter that I know everyone sends because I get about 17 emails from different wealth institutions right now and I can't recommend any of them. It's sad, it saddens me. It's basically, it's like we talked about before. I could interchange Well, here's a great opportunity for one financial brand that says we're going to do it differently. We're going to focus on this particular audience and we're going to, every time we send something out, we're going to make sure there's something that's going to change that person's life in a positive way. If we do that, I think it will change the entire structure of the organization and that right there is why I'm so passionate about educating and empowering financial brands because when you transform a person's wallet and their financial well being, you transform both their physical well being and their mental well being a great point, joe. This has been a fantastic conversation. If anyone is listening, they want to connect with you what is the best way for them to do...

...that. You've got the podcast, continent podcast, highly recommend subscribing to that. You've got the book. Where can they pick that up helicopter. Got a little bit of everything. Thank you. Content dash inc dot com is the book and then everything else you can find at the tilt dot com. You can subscribe to that, that you can get to this old marketing podcast continent podcast. If you become a subscriber, you're all good. But yeah, the tilt dot com is our new thing. So if your content creator, you'll get something out of it. We talk about a lot of the stuff we just talked about today. So excellent. Make sure that you subscribe, make sure that you listen, make sure that you get the book content. Inc joe once again, thanks for joining me on another episode of Banking on Digital Growth. James. Super fun. Really appreciate the time. As always it until next time be. Well, do good and make your bed. Thank you for listening to another episode of banking on digital growth with James robert. Ley like what you hear, tell a friend about the podcast and leave us a review on apple podcasts, google podcasts or Spotify and subscribe While you're there. To get even more practical improvement insights, visit www dot digital growth dot com to grab a preview of James roberts, best selling book banking on digital growth or order a copy right now for you and your team from amazon Inside you'll find a strategic marketing and sales blueprint framed around 12 key areas of focus that empower you to confidently generate 10 times more loans and deposits until next time, be well and do good.

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