Banking on Digital Growth
Banking on Digital Growth

Episode · 4 months ago

90) #ExponentialInsights: Digital Growth Rocket Fuel: 7 Steps to a Content-First Business

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Content is the fuel in your digital growth engine.

If you maximize your content, then you maximize your future digital growth potential.

In this episode, I speak with Joe Pulizzi, Founder at The Tilt and Author of Content Inc., and he shares his step-by-step approach to crafting the highest-octane content around.

What we talked about:

- Why it’s more important to build an audience than a product

- Why you need to start simple and then expand

- The 7 steps to crafting high-octane content

- Why every financial brand is a publisher, whether they know it or not

You can find this interview and many more by subscribing to Banking on Digital Growth on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or here.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Banking on Digital Growth in your favorite podcast player.
 

...there's a better way to launch a newproduct inside a company or to launch a new business and thats build theaudience first figure out an audience that has some unmet needs, solve thosepain points through consistently delivered information and then once youdo that, just listen to them, they will absolutely tell you what they'rewilling to purchase. Mhm. Mhm. Right. You're listening to banking on digitalgrowth. With James robert lay a podcast that empowers financial brand marketingsales and leadership teams to maximize their digital growth potential byGenerating 10 times more loans and deposits. Today's episode is part ofthe exponential insight series where James robert interviews the industry'stop marketing sales and fintech leaders, sharing practical wisdom toexponentially elevate you and your team. Let's get into the show greetings andhello, I am James robert, ley and welcome to the 90th episode of theBanking on digital Growth podcast. Today's episode is part of theexponential insight series and I'm excited to welcome joe policy to theshow. Joe has founded four companies including the digital content news site,the tilt as well as the Content Marketing Institute. In 2014, hereceived the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Content Council and his podcastseries. This old marketing with robert Rose has millions of downloads fromover 150 countries. Joe is also the amazon best selling author of contentinc killing marketing and UP content marketing, which was named a must readbusiness book by Fortune magazine. And now, after all of that, joe hasreleased the second edition of Content inc, which is exactly what we're gonnabe talking about today as I shared many times before. Content is the fuel ofthe digital growth engine and with...

...content, inc joe provides a step bystep approach for financial brands to maximize the value of their content andas a result maximized their future digital growth potential. Welcome tothe show, joe Well, James, thank you so much for having me. I feel um I feelexcited and we're gonna talk a little bit of content. Get into somediscussion about how banks can make this. Are you banks, all financialinstitutions who we're talking to? We're talking financial brands as awhole. So when you think about that, we have banks, we have credit unions,Fintech, neo, awesome challenger banks. So that's why we look at the umbrellahere of financial brands before we get into that. I always like to start thison a positive note about just something that you're excited about personally orprofessionally. Well, personally, we mentioned this before the show, I'vegot two teenage boys that are going off to college uh the pandemic sort ofmixed things up because we were supposed to have one go off last year,one go this year didn't quite work that way. We're going to have both go at thesame time in the fall. So fingers crossed that that actually happens.Well, you're you're a little bit further down the road because we've got,we've got 10, 86 and four. So they're going to be right there back to back toback very soon. Spacing. That's impressive facing. It was definitely,definitely, definitely was planned playing that way. So they're going offto school. That's big news coming off the school. We're going to be emptynesters. So we'll see how that my wife and I, so we've been looking forward tothis for a long time. We'll see, we'll see how it goes. We actually, we didhave a lot of travel planned a few years ago. We had to cancel for obviousreasons. So maybe we'll get back out there and do that and then uh you know,we'll talk about some of the, some of the work stuff, some of the careerstuff I, you know, a couple years ago I...

...took a full sabbatical, I took a fullyear off after selling content marketing institute and now I'm and alot of cases because of the pandemic, I'm back into it. I felt that thereneeds to be more focused on helping content creators, which is why we cameout with content ink again, which is why we launched the tilt and then mylove and passion from a philanthropic standpoint is Orange Effect Foundation,my wife and I've been doing that for Jeez almost 15 years now, we'rebasically, we, we fundraise to help kids who need speech therapy, who havespeech disorders get the speech therapy they need and that's kind of our ourpassion project. So a lot a lot of stuff going on James and uh we can talkabout some of it. Well I gotta appreciate that because it's funny thatI'm doing a podcast and do a lot of speaking. But as a child actually wentthrough speech therapy, I really did, I really did, obviously worked. It didand I'll tell you the fascinating thing. Um even about two years ago I actuallyhad my tongue clipped because it was still creating some problems my speechpathology And worked with the speech pathologist. And so this has been kindof a continuous, ongoing journey of growth in this particular area. Sograteful for the work that you're doing with your wife and the philanthropy inthat area. And you know, I mean it was easy, easy decision. I mean, my myoldest who's now 19, He didn't have any verbal words when he was three yearsold. So aggressive speech and play therapy for 56 years and now he'sfantastic. He do whatever he wants to do, and that's all we're trying to do.And what I didn't realize there's a lot of families can't afford speech therapyinsurance doesn't cover, you know, a lot of the details, but most peopledon't when you have to decide between putting food on the table and speechtherapy, you put food on the table. So when in a gun that comes back to a lotof what we talk about here with...

...financial brands, that the work you'redoing is much bigger than. So its purpose driven. It's it's it's framedaround creating value for much more than just yourself, for your family.But it's you're you're taking this to a much larger audience and and you know,you you talked about you took a sabbatical, you got back into it. Youopen up content, inc nine powerful words that hooked me, drew me in rightoff the bat. You wrote the model described in this book, saved my life. Let's start the conversation there.Because I think why did it save your life? How did it save your life? Well,first of all, thank you for reading the first page of the book. Alright, I readI read it all well, thank you. It was, you know, so to go back to 2007, I wasI was working for a large media company. I had an executive position. Thingswere good, but I always had an inch to start a company. Had to talk with mywife And I said, I really think, you know, of course she knew about this fora long time and she was on me about are you going to make the decision or not?And then in March of 2007, I said, Okay, I'm gonna do it. Made the decision left,and we had to change things around and figure things out. And I had thisamazing idea for this matching digital matching product that I thought wouldbe great. We were going to be the harmony for content marketing, that'show we were pitching it. And I thought it was the greatest thing ever andaccept that nobody bought it and it didn't work out very well. And in 2000and passed for two years from there in 2009, I'm ready to walk away like thisis not working. I didn't even tell anybody, but I was actually looking fora job and trying to find somebody to hire me. We had no money, we were indebt. I had two small kids, I'm like this is not going to work. And thenfinally, For whatever reason, after...

...feeling sorry for myself, I startedlook looking at the feedback from my blog subscribers at the time because Istarted a blog thankfully in 2007 about content marketing was called thecontent revolution and I'm trying to pitch them a product of this e harmonymatching thing and what they were asking for is joe is are there anyevents that I could go to so I can network with people that are dealingwith content issues. Joe is there do you do consulting joe? Is their smallworkshops we can get joe. Is there any online training for content marketing?All these questions that they were asking, saying that they were going tobuy stuff from us but we didn't offer those things. So basically did thepivot from that moment on. And so this is September 2009. I remember I wroteit on a cocktail napkin and I said we are going to change everything goingcontent marketing all the way we're going to create the leading onlinedestination for content marketing, which became Content MarketingInstitute. We can create the leading magazine and content marketing, ChiefContent Officer magazine, which we created in january the next year. Andthen we're going to create the largest in person event in the world Forcontent marketing called Content Marketing World. And my goal was toaccomplish all those things by 2013 and believe it or not, James, we ended updoing all those by 2012. And the model that saved us back to your originalconversation is luckily we built this audience of loyal subscribers and likewe had sort of, as just happened happened to as we were creating,creating all this blog content And we built this audience of 10,000 plus. Andso instead of pushing this product down their throats that they didn't want tobuy, all I did was just start listening to those thousands of subscribers andthey told us exactly what they would buy, shape the model around it. And wehad a wonderful, amazing exit in 2016...

...and all our financial dreams came trueand it was because we built a loyal audience focused on the content niche,focused on a very particular who and it all came together. And I think thatright, there is a really what I would call a contrarian point of view, youknow, I even you wrote about this about Peter thiel and you know, you and youyou had this experience, you built this product and you went to go look forpeople and I see a lot of financial brands do the same thing. Even Fintech,they build the product and then they try to find the audience to match theproduct. And so this contrarian approach, I know it's gonna confuse andperplex, perplex many financial brand leaders who have taken this, you don'tagree with it. Number one, what's the problem with this legacy? Thinking ofwhat we'll just call it, putting the product first, particularly in thispost, Covid digital world, and then what's the optimal path forward beyondjust pushing and promoting product here? Well, it's just so weird, we think thatthere's one way to start a business and that's product lead. And as I've beendoing research on this audience first model, which will, will unpack a littlebit, uh realize that, oh my gosh, okay, all these companies are creating theseproducts and there's such a high failure rate. I mean in three years,more than 50% of these product led initiatives fail. I'm like, okay,that's, that's interesting. You get everybody including peter feel andevery other product business startup guru out there saying, oh, well, thisis great. Just create an unbelievable product and everything will work out,but it doesn't. And so, and by the way, it's really risky and really expensiveand really time consuming and you're like, okay, well this, there's got tobe a better way and that's where We...

...started. So probably by in 2014, Istarted interviewing these companies who created an audience first Model,which is basically they build an audience whether that's an emailnewsletter, a podcast, a blog, Youtube series, Ticktock, whatever the cases.They built a loyal audience. And then after 9, 12, 18 months, they start tomonetise that audience in different ways. And then after 24 months, theydiversified into other areas. And then in five years, generally what we findout is these startups and I know we'll talk about financial brands, but inthis case the startup, five years, $5 million valuation seems fairly regularthing and they don't have the high start up costs that you do when youcreate a new product. And I thought that we were on to something like thiscan't be a thing right there. They're like, why are more people thinkingabout this? But we just change takes so long. People don't think that there'sactually a different way to do it. So that's why I've been out on this, youknow, marathon podcasting tour, I'm doing a book tour coming up. I'll tellanyone who will listen to me saying, I think there's a better way to launch anew product inside a company or to launch a new business. And thats buildthe audience, first figure out an audience that has some unmet needs,solve those pain points through consistently delivered information. Andthen once you do that, just listen to them, they will absolutely tell youwhat they're willing to purchase. And I would say the same for any financialbrand out there. Figure out that that core customer base or the peace of thecustomer base that you really want to affect in some way and maybe you havean idea for what that product should be. But I wouldn't launch the product hadfocused on solving those needs so that they rely on you every day every week,every month with whatever information they become loyal to your informationon an ongoing basis, and then you talk to them and then you launch yourproduct and then it's a raging success...

...because why don't you build a loyalaudience? You can sell them whatever you want. And that right there, that isthe big, transformative perspective, build the audience first, not theproduct, and it's an acronym that I teach go all in on whatever it is thatwe're doing here asking, listening and learning because people are going totell you, inform you and it's going to take time. But I want to address thisbecause there's a lot of misconceptions when it comes to content, specificallyin the financial services space, A lot of fear, I can think about how are wegoing to focus? We're trying to do all of this for everyone. We don't haveclarity of who we really need to zone in on what, what might be at a macrolevel. And then we'll move into the content inc model here for financialbrands. But when we think about financial services, financial brands,what is a common belief that others might have about content marketing forfinancial brands that you just passionately disagree with? Well, theone, I don't know if I'm answering this precisely, but I've heard thisspecifically from financial brands, because I'll go in and they'll say,here's the audience were targeting. We're targeting consumers of X to X agewith these general pain points and personas and whatever, and they'll say,great, what do we do here? And I say you can't do anything there because youcan't be the leading informational expert about anything to that broadergroup of people. So you have to mix it up a little bit more. So, uh, I I justuse this one that's on my mind is a little bit different than financial,but we can get to more financial examples, but somebody has inmanufacturing said, I target plant...

...managers. I said, your target plantmanagers. I said, can you be the leading informational expert inanything to plant managers? And they're thinking like, no, I'm like, okay, wellwhat if it's plant managers who work in companies that are 10,000 people ormore? Could you do that? Like, maybe what about plant managers who work inlarge companies that outsource specifically to India and china? Couldyou be the leading exponent? He's maybe I'm like, okay, you're getting close,that's the type of exercise that I want to do. So if I'm on the financial sideand I'm looking at, like I said, I'm targeting institutions. I'm targetinginstitutions. I'm targeting institutions of what size institutions,where in the world, institutions that have, what particular pain points? Whatkeeps those people up at night? How are those needs different than any otherneeds that are out there? And then you get to a point and unique yourself downso much that you can say yes, joe. I think I can actually be the leadingexpert in that content area to that group of people. I said now we gotsomething. I'm going to always go bigger. You can never go small. I'mgonna put my yes, you can always go bigger. You can never go smaller. Thatright there. Key insight, key takeaway. I'm gonna put my ceo hat on because Ihear this having the same types of conversations. But joe what abouteveryone else who's not in this niche segment? Like can we still help them?Can we still serve them or are we missing something? Is is it a mindsetblock that's getting in our way with this type of thinking. It's funny justbecause you market to a certain group of people don't it doesn't mean thatyou can't serve everyone. Like if you like I just I actually just 20 minutesago got done talking with the consultant and he was he was saying,well if I market to this group of people, what if somebody in thisindustry wants my services? I said well fine, that's your decision. You cantake those services, you can take that...

...job. We're talking about marketing,we're talking about positioning you as the leading expert in something. It hasnothing to do. You can still service half the world if you want to. Butwe're talking about where you feel because if you're choosing the marketto a certain group of people in a certain way, you feel there's anopportunity there competitive advantage for some reason. Well, good, let'sfocus on that. But if somebody else wants to open a checking account withyou, great, fine take it. I don't care. And that right there is, I thinkanother key insight and learning to take away is just because you marketand you niche down your marketing, messaging your positioning your contentaround a specific group segment, niche of people or an audience doesn't meanthat you cannot help anyone else that falls outside of this. This iscritically important for financial brands, particularly communityinstitutions, even thin tech that don't have, say, the capitals of the Bank ofAmerica's and the Chases of the world, Who can go out, I mean, you know, chase$2.5 billion dollar marketing budget. I'm a community institution that's twobillion in assets. Well, I'm gonna have to be very smart with where I'm puttingmy time, effort and energy, which brings us into the content inc modelhere. Seven steps that I'd like to just unpacked together with you briefly forthe dear listener, we've got the sweet spot number one, The Content Tilt # two,the base number three audience building, number four revenue, number five,diversify number six cell or go big number seven. Let's dive into the firststep. What is the sweet spot? And how might financial brands find this? It'sa great segue of what we're talking about right here with like niche ngdown. Sure, absolutely. And what I love the first three of these seven, it'sbefore you create any piece of content. And I want to make this clear becausemost financial organizations that...

...create any kind of content marketing,they generally just start creating stuff and they don't go through anykind of strategic process and this is all we're doing. We're going throughstrategic process and we're going to ask some of the hard questions aboutwhether or not we should be doing this or not because in a lot of cases James,we'll get out of a meeting, I'll get out of a discovery meeting with, let'ssay, a financial burden CMO at a financial brand and they'll decide notto do something which is completely fine. If you say no that you are notgoing to do this video series, that might be a really good thing. The worldprobably doesn't need another video series. Broad video series about whatwe're going to solve your financial challenges. Let's let's think a littlebit harder about this. So we start with the sweet spot. Sweet spot is theintersection of what you, as an organization have proficiency andwhat's your expertise? What's your skill level? What are you good at? Whatdo you have any kind of authority to communicate on? And then on the otherside it's your audiences desire, what are their pain points? What keeps themup at night? And the, those two things come together and you come up with somekind of basic mission statement, you're going to deliver daily financialinformation to institutions that are getting into Cryptocurrency, right?Whatever. Okay, great, that's fine. Everyone starts with a sweet spot.Nobody does the content tilt. That's the important part. The content tilt iswhat can you do that will differentiate you from everybody else out there.Right. Let's uh, type in financial services into google, type in yourkeyword into google and then look at what you're creating and what yourcompetitive competitors are creating. And I guarantee you probably won't beable to see the difference. Like what are you really differentiating yourselfwith the content you create? And here's a really challenging statement and so Idon't want to offend anybody, but let's just say you took all your content andall the information, all the videos,...

...and blogs and podcasts and everythingyou do for your customers, You put it in a box and ship it away. Do yourcustomers even notice? Will your customers notice? The answer sadly isthey won't, you're not making an impact on them? And that's where the contenttilt is so important is you have to figure out why is it worth your customers tied forthem to avert their attention from netflix and google and everything elsegoing on to pay attention to what you have. So the content is the mostimportant part of this technology has transformed our world and digital haschanged the way consumers shop for and buy financial services forever. Now,consumers make purchase decisions long before they walk into a branch. If theywalk into a branch at all, but your financial brand still wants to growloans and deposits, we get it. Digital growth can feel confusing, frustratingand overwhelming for any financial brand, marketing and sales leader, butit doesn't have to because James robert wrote the book that guides you everystep of the way along your digital growth journey, visit www dot digitalgrowth dot com to get a preview of his best selling book banking on digitalgrowth or order a copy right now for you and your team from amazon insideyou'll find a strategic marketing manifesto that was written to transformfinancial brands and it is packed full of practical and proven insights youcan start using today To confidently generate 10 times more loans anddeposits. Now back to the show what we're saying as a financial brand. Howis that different? What value are are we creating? What's our uniqueperspective, the tilt, the angle that we're bringing to bear? Because onceagain, a great exercise, anyone who's listening can do this, go to yourwebsite, copy and paste some of just...

...your product pages, copy and paste thatinto a word doc, copy and paste your competitors into a word doc to removeall branding elements. How different are they? Really? And that's the,that's just from a product positioning now. It's okay. Well how can wetransform that thinking to go beyond? Because if you think about financialservices, all verticals have been commoditized in some shape, form orfashion because of google but financial services, a checking account checkingaccount of mortgages and mortgage credit card as a credit card. This tome is where we have to become very clear of first and foremost, that sweetspot then the content tilt because the next thing that comes into play as youmentioned, which is building the base or building the audience. And that's tome is one of my favorite cause this is where things start to become moretangible that we can touch, grasp, see, understand. Not so theoretical. Solet's talk about that. How can a financial brand begin to build the basehere? So you've got your, you got your audience, you have some idea of howyou're going to differentiate and then you're going to figure out what yourhome, what's your platform where most Companies, most financial organizations,they say well, just because we can maybe we should, maybe we should do thepodcast and the email newsletter and the blog and the Webinar series and thein person event series. And, and every, you know, an average, if you look atthe research, an average larger brand does between 14 and 16 differentcontent activities. So that just becomes a mess. Not that's exhaustingand you know what, it doesn't work. What does work? You start with one, youstart with the leading podcast to that audience in your industry. You startwith the most amazing blog. You start with this incredible youtube series.You do like use the bank in Scandinavia. They do a fantastic views Cobank tv andthey decided just to do a television...

...station, they're actually one of thenumber one financial education stations and it's it's a bank. So these are thetypes of things that you focus on and just do that and why is that? Becauseyou can't be uh master of everything at once. If you look at how every greatmedia brand, every great content brand in the world was developed. They alwaysstarted with one thing, Red Bull Media House, That's great, that's a greatexample of how they start with a print magazine, Huffington Post. Great,they've got 400 different blogs. How did they start with one blog to oneaudience ted talks series? Oh my God, they're everywhere, they get videos allover how they start with one event in person event. This is how it startsbuild your audience one way one platform, then you can move on and growaudience, but you don't do everything at one time, I can't help but hear danSullivan, who's been a guest on this podcast in the back of my mind over astrategic coach, he always talks about the need to simplify before we multiplyand and it really comes down to this idea of one. And you mentioned theexample over in Scandinavia, I'm also thinking of Frost Bank out of texas andthey're building a platform called Opt for optimism because they've done theirown research. They've partnered, I think it was with the University oftexas and what they found is that optimist actually do financially betterthan pessimist and so they have found that there's so much mindset work and Iknow, you know when reading continent, you, one of your early books that youread, that kind of started on this path, this journey was napoleon Hill, thinkand grow rich, so much mindset work that comes into play. And opt forOptimism is a content platform that Frost Bank is building around thisparticular subject matter here, Let's move on to step five, where I know theceos that are listening in, their CFO...

...counterparts are going to be very happybecause this is now about monetization using content to generate revenue. Whatare some of those opportunities to monetize content? So if you're a, let'ssay, a traditional financial brand, you've got four that I would callcontent marketing revenue streams. Generally you say, okay, well if Ibuild an audience, I can sell more products. Great. If I build this loyalaudience, I can sell more services. Okay, that's too, you could say, well,if I Deliver them something on a regular basis, could I create moreloyal customers? That's the traditional content marketing. That's your JohnDeere. The Furrow magazine started in 1895. Why do they do that? Why dopeople that receive that still want to get by John Deere equipment? Great.That's loyalty. And then my favorite for financial brands is grow bettercustomers create higher yield. One of my favorite case studies is TDAmeritrade has a magazine called think Money magazine, which goes to heavytraders and they did, you know when they, when they first went to theemergency first bought this magazine from I think think or swim, when theybought think or swim, they got this magazine called Think Money. They don'tknow what to do with it. And it took them two years to find the data. Andwhat they found out was those traders that read that magazine ended uptrading five times more than those that didn't read it, create better customers.So those are the four general ways to drive revenues. And then by the way, ifyou haven't noticed brands of all sizes are actually driving revenue like mediacompanies with. so they're selling ongoing training, paid trainingopportunities are running events like, uh, hopefully Dream Forest will comeback from Salesforce. But Sales, Salesforce's Dream Force was almost abillion dollar entity in and of itself...

...from evaluation standpoint from atechnology company creating an event that's just as valuable. If you look atsomebody like a Red Bull media house, if you say, okay, what's more valuableRed Bull media house or Red Bull, I can't answer that question. They'reboth worth millions and millions of dollars. So you've got events andadvertising and sponsorship and subscriptions and donations and allthose types of things. Well, what I would focus on is what ultimately atthe end of the day, what's going to make the most of the business Probablyin your case, James for financial brands. You're looking at products,services, loyal customers are better customers and it could be a combinationof all of those. Yeah. You know, you talk about the event and the podcast,how some of the sorts to fit together I think of messiah savings bank out ofmaine. They've built a platform called Fast Forward Main. It's an event thatthey bring all these small local businesses together that the bank ishosting the party and they're empowering, they're educating all ofthese small businesses and then they're supporting that in person of it. Wellit was in person and then it went virtual and the virtual event actuallyperformed far better than the end person of it. It brought more attendeesto the table and then they have a content to continue to support theseongoing efforts. And so it almost creates this on it's like a flywheel.Once you get the will turning, that's the hardest part. You think about spinspin class, in cycling, it's hard to get the wheel turning, but once thewheel turning it it creates its own momentum correct? Well, what theamazing thing is even though content initiatives start with one revenue path,it generally ends up to be 56 or seven different ones, you end up looking likean amazon or like an apple that drives or Disney that drives so many differentrevenue opportunities. And I think what we need to keep in mind games is thatwe're all publishers, all financial brands or publishers, it's just some rI don't believe it, some believe it,...

...some don't believe it, you're in denial,that's fine. But every one of us can published today, every one of us ispublishing today and you actually want to make an impact and drive revenue ornot, that's the decision you need to make. Absolutely That that idea of Ofmultiple channels diversification brings us to step six. You know I thinkmy child savings bank, they have their their in person event virtual eventpodcast. What are some of the diversification that we can think aboutonce we gain that competency in the starting? Because it's not about eatingthe elephant, it's about taking that first bite. Where are thediversification opportunities? Future thinking here. Yeah. So I mean justfrom what we did at C. M. I. It's the natural path that we started with ablog in a blog that we just did for 20 months. And then once we did that blogwe launched the magazine And then after nine months, 12 months after that. Thenwe launched the event then another year and a half after that we launched apodcast and then we launched a webinar program. We launched our researchseries. So basically you create a media empire if you will and you go from stepto step two step. That the important thing is you still have to build thatbase first. You can't diversify too quickly. And that's what scares mebecause we can do all this, we can publish everything. But you get allthese brands and say, oh it's just diversify all. I want to do it all atonce. That does not work. You have to wait a little bit generally after thebase. You gotta wait about 12 to 18 months for this thing to really work.But then you can really diversify. Sony's got a really interesting programthat they have called Alpha Universe, where they started with just a blog.And then they said, okay, well then we're going to do some in person, inperson events for photographers. We're going to do that and then we're gonnado a podcast and then they did that. Those are all step by step by step. Andthen they launched their own online training program. I can see a financialbrand doing the same thing. I mean, you...

...know, you could talk better than Icould about the amount of financial training that's going on on a consumerand an institution side, the opportunities there for paid and unpaid.That it's just crazy. It's paid and unpaid because from my viewpoint of theworld, you have content, you build this base and then so you got financialeducation, financial literacy. But from what we have found through our researchthat is actually probably doing more harm than good, because it gives peoplea pseudo confidence that, oh, I read this stuff online. I know and money isinherently has a high cognitive load, It's extremely complex. There's a lotof financial shame that holds people back from achieving their fullpotential in life. And so to me, the next level up in financial services isactually around what I call financial coaching, so that you have content anda coach that actually hold someone accountable, but they can continue toprovide that training, that education and it creates this upward spiral thatcan be group. So maybe it's, it's more of a community of sorts. If you will,it can become paid to where you might have an annual review with a financialcoach. The financial jim. Actually, out of new york is already working aroundthis type of practice and principle. They're not a financial institution,but the same thinking can be brought internally, which then creates valueand it, and it comes back to your point, product, service loyalty, higher yielddeeper level relationships. And as things continue to grow, that bringsthe steps seven, which is to sell or go big in this particular case, you know,most likely I see a financial institution probably doubling down orthey could potentially sell off a content asset and you create value thatway. Yeah, you absolutely could. But I agree with you. I think this is whereyou get to the point saying, okay, are we really going to take this seriously?We really gonna go big and the opportunity right now. And you know, Italked about a lot in the book is if...

I'm a financial brand, I'm starting topick off smaller blogs, podcast, media properties, short magazines, events andbuy them. Uh, this is the opportunity and marketing that nobody talks enoughabout, but it is absolutely happening. I just talked to three of my podcast orfriends that absolutely said that they would sell and I had one that just soldjust sold to a larger brand. This is happening right now whether you want tobelieve it or not. And we just talked about how much patience and how mucheffort it takes to build this whole content, inc strategy thing. So youmight be saying maybe you have some, maybe maybe don't spend thatadvertising program, maybe take that money and buy a podcast by a blog, by awebsite with domain authority, by a mini event. Those types that target thecustomers that you're trying to target because it's absolutely working well.And that's I grew up in publishing James and that's what I learned.Marketers want to create everything organically first. If you're apublisher, you always look to buy first and that is the difference and that iswhere you know, to shortcut some of this learning for the dear listener Fincon expo dot com tab is community. You can go to Youtube, Youtubers andpodcasters and it's a list that they've compiled and aggregated for individualswho have already or who are already building their own audiences, their ownplatforms and make them an offer if it's something. So for example, I canthink of a financial brand who might want to target the busy mom and that'san important market right there because we know from research, it's the femalethat typically controls the household finances, manages the householdfinances. And so when you can tap into that, who's already working in thatsphere of influence, will shortcut that learning and then just go and buy thoseassets by those resources. And it's a...

...win win, win, win for the financialbrand went for the influencer and win for the end consumer, that busy mombecause you'll be able to tap in and continue to create exponential value.Well, that's what you said is important. What who's the, who, who were trying totarget, who already targets that group really well. What are they doing? Andare they for sale And you make your little list like you have and I havemine to make a little cheat sheet list of. I'd love to have that website, I'dlove to have that event whatever and you just slowly over time approachedthem. I mean this is just M and A. Is is this what what, this is whatpublishers do and I think that is a huge opportunity. I've got a goodfriend of mine runs the program in a row. Electronics are electronics is afortune 1, 20 company, $24 billion in revenue. Last year they bought 55 0different brands and now they are the largest media company in the B two Belectronics industry. And they did so over a three year process by buyingcompanies and by the way each one of those are profitable in and ofthemselves and then also sell more products and services. I think it'sbeautiful. It really is. A lot of people don't do it and I can't help butthink you know and you mentioned this a couple times before talking through theseven steps of the content. Eek model is thinking marketing, transformingtheir mindset beyond thinking of just marketing from the traditional sense ofads and buys. But taking on that publisher first that media firstmentality what's a recommendation you can make to maybe begin to transformsome of that thinking of how they view themselves because you talked aboutdenial. How can we overcome that? So this is a this is a very tough exercisethat you can do with your your team. So you have to prepare yourself before youdo it. But it absolutely works. Everything is about digital experiencestoday. That's how most of your customers interact with us. Even we seeeven with banks, right, you don't go...

...into a bank much anymore. You're in,you're you're engaging online and digital experience in some way. Solet's take a look. Let's do an audit of your digital experiences. How do let'slook at your website. Let's look at your blog. Let's look at your podcast.Let's look at your e newsletter that probably nobody in the company reads.But let's look at it anyways and do that audit. And you and I wouldrecommend an outside organization doing it. But if you want to do it insidecost you nothing. You just have to be honest about your two. And I've done ita couple times. And what you realize is most of your marketing team doesn'treally know what's going on in different parts of the organization atall. This content is going out. The sales team generally doesn't know andit's lackluster at best, especially the email newsletters. The emailnewsletters are terrible. And that is your first line of defense. You'resending out emails on going to all your customers and it's bad. You're probablyalready considered spam. So we have some work to do. And I think that'swhere you start to get together. And you realize, look, if if we're adigital content company, which every financial brand is and this is how wepresent ourselves. It's just like we used to think if Mcdonald's goldenarches were falling down, that's what's happening with our content right now.So let's fix it now. And I think that's what I want to leave on. There's a lotthat we've talked about. There's a lot that we've talked through. I'm alwaysabout one quick win, some micro behavior, something practical,something actionable. That the dear listener can take apply to get somecourage to get some conference to continue to explore this methodologythat you've unpacked now for a second time with continent coming back out.What would that one thing you could recommend to the dear listener make that one action to just begin tomake some progress forward on this...

...journey here. I would question whoyou're sending your communications to and just take the couple weeks to gothrough. For example, make a list. Let's say you send an email newsletter.Who is that email news that are really going to? Is it niche enough? Is itreally, really doing honest? And I like I like to start with the email becausewhat financial brands have generally done so well is they end up getting alot of personal data and personal information. And at some point you're going to get alot of our customer base is because the customer bases that are going to revoltbecause we're not respecting that relationship by sending qualityconsistent information. So an easy place to start is with that emailnewsletter. So don't do the full audit that we talked about a second ago.Let's just start with that email newsletter that I know everyone sendsbecause I get about 17 emails from different wealth institutions right nowand I can't recommend any of them. It's sad, it saddens me. It's basically,it's like we talked about before. I could interchange Well, here's a greatopportunity for one financial brand that says we're going to do itdifferently. We're going to focus on this particular audience and we'regoing to, every time we send something out, we're going to make sure there'ssomething that's going to change that person's life in a positive way. If wedo that, I think it will change the entire structure of the organizationand that right there is why I'm so passionate about educating andempowering financial brands because when you transform a person's walletand their financial well being, you transform both their physical wellbeing and their mental well being a great point, joe. This has been afantastic conversation. If anyone is listening, they want to connect withyou what is the best way for them to do...

...that. You've got the podcast, continentpodcast, highly recommend subscribing to that. You've got the book. Where canthey pick that up helicopter. Got a little bit of everything. Thank you.Content dash inc dot com is the book and then everything else you can findat the tilt dot com. You can subscribe to that, that you can get to this oldmarketing podcast continent podcast. If you become a subscriber, you're allgood. But yeah, the tilt dot com is our new thing. So if your content creator,you'll get something out of it. We talk about a lot of the stuff we just talkedabout today. So excellent. Make sure that you subscribe, make sure that youlisten, make sure that you get the book content. Inc joe once again, thanks forjoining me on another episode of Banking on Digital Growth. James. Superfun. Really appreciate the time. As always it until next time be. Well, dogood and make your bed. Thank you for listening to another episode of bankingon digital growth with James robert. Ley like what you hear, tell a friendabout the podcast and leave us a review on apple podcasts, google podcasts orSpotify and subscribe While you're there. To get even more practicalimprovement insights, visit www dot digital growth dot com to grab apreview of James roberts, best selling book banking on digital growth or ordera copy right now for you and your team from amazon Inside you'll find astrategic marketing and sales blueprint framed around 12 key areas of focusthat empower you to confidently generate 10 times more loans anddeposits until next time, be well and do good.

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