Banking on Digital Growth
Banking on Digital Growth

Episode · 8 months ago

147) #NewStartsNow: Building Digital Growth into a New Community Bank

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The pace of change in the financial world we’re seeing today is unprecedented — and the rate of change is only accelerating.

For many community banks, it can be hard to keep up…

But not for those willing to blaze a new path forward.

Today, I’m joined by two trailblazers, Keith Costello, President & CEO, and Kelsey Weaver, Board Member, at Locality Bank, where they are building an innovative new community bank — ready for the change we all know is coming over the horizon.

In this episode, we discuss:

- How Keith and Kelsey approached launching a new, digital-growth-ready community bank

- The importance of mindset to digital growth

You can find this interview and many more by subscribing to Banking on Digital Growth on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or here.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Banking on Digital Growth in your favorite podcast player.

I think there's something to attracting the right talent by having easier technology and having people be able to use their brains and have technology replaced. Some of the mundane repetitive tasks. Mm hmm Mhm. You're listening to banking on digital growth with James robert Ley who believes there is no better time than now to educate and empower financial brands to gain a fresh perspective around future growth opportunities. That's why today's episode is part of the new starts now series brought to you by Nimbus who offers a complete set of tech tools and services, all designed and engineered to empower you and your financial brand to maximize your future growth potential greetings and hello I am James robert ley and welcome to 147th episode of the banking on digital growth podcast. Today's episode is part of the news starts now series and I'm excited to welcome Kelsey, weaver and keith Costello to the show. Both keith and Kelsey are veteran entrepreneurs in the banking space who have each started lead and have managed multiple brands over the years now. They're working together on their next adventure with keith as the president and Ceo and Kelsey on the board of locality locality is a digital community bank on a mission to build better banking as sustainable futures for south florida businesses. Welcome to the show, Kelsey and keith. It is so good to have you on today. Thank you James robert. Great to be here. Thanks for having us. Absolutely. One of the things I always like to do is just start start things off on a positive note and I want to hear from you both what's good personally professionally, what's what's one good thing that's been happening for you that has you excited that has you energized? Let Chelsea go first. Well, I was gonna say, I mean, I think it's been a big week and a big celebration for things happening for the bank to be official. So we have our kick off later this evening. So we officially got our, with the approval letter from the FBI. That is that is big news. That is fantastic news, congratulations on that keith. What about you? What's good? Yes, so excited about that. And we're also simultaneously doing our fundraising. So we have a $23 million dollar capital goal that we have surpassed in terms of our subscription agreements were actually were over 29 million and subscriptions right now. So as everybody knows, a subscription is not cash, it's not It's not the same thing. So now we need to get all those funds in. So we're reaching out to all of our investors and saying our deadline's November 15, we need all the funds to get in. And so what happens now, James, I was like kind of crazy, there's all these rules just don't want our attorney talking about all of these things now that have to occur and it's like within five days of this, you have to do this and then after you have to send out a listing of all your shareholders and then you have to have an annual meeting 30 days after that. And it's, it's a little bit mind boggling, but it's all fun and we're, you know, working our way through the process, hearing you talk through that, you said it's all fun and I think that this is gonna be a fun conversation because it's not every day we go out and we start a new organization, we start a new financial brand, we start a new bank. And this is a journey, particularly with the list that you're taking and you recently he shared a quote on linkedin from nelson Mandela. There's no passion to be found playing small and settling for a life that is less than the one you're capable of, of living. And I really connected with this personally, I believe growth is a...

...journey, There's a journey from Good to great and I know that sometimes we can get trapped, we can get stuck in what I call and I'm writing about and the next book, Banking on Change, which is what I call the cave of complacency. I know a lot of bankers sometimes get stuck there. Sometimes they struggle to break free from the cave and I want to go back in your own mind. Key think about your own journey of growth that you've taken over the years as, as a banker to keep playing a bigger game. How do you ensure that you have not got trapped to not get stuck to break free from this cave of complacency and what have you done going back to nelsons quote to play an even bigger game with all the work that you're doing here because it is exciting. It is fun. So I think back because I was always an entrepreneurial, but it's very easy when you have a family and you have Children and you have probably start to accumulate obligations and as we go through life and we're not really thinking about, we're not necessarily conscious about and planning every step along the way. So before you know it, you have a mortgage, you have a bunch of kids so you have all these obligations that occur and so it's very easy to cling to a job of security and to hold on to that and to say you know I've got a good job, I'm lucky I'm taking care of my family, which is an important thing and it's always felt like I wanted to do more though and it was interesting because I had the opportunity to go back to 2007. I'm working at bank in Fort Lauderdale called the bank of florida and the bank of florida was organized by some of the most prominent people in Fort Lauderdale at the time who's, who of the business community, you know, wayne high, using a lot of people are billionaire founder of Autonation and a bunch of other company was a shareholder and so I was working at that bank and I was really enjoying my role there when somebody approached me and said, we want to start a bank in Fort Lauderdale and we need a ceo and at that time was the chief learning officer, so I was an executive officer at this bank of florida and I thought to myself, you know, got a good job, you know, I've got at that time I have four kids and I have two ex wives and I'm thinking to myself, oh my gosh, you know, this is a huge risk, I'm 50 years old to at the time, and I said to the guys, I said, listen, I can run your bank and I'm entrepreneurial enough to take that challenge, but I don't want to have to raise money, I just, you know, it's not, I think that's beneath me to have to go, I'm a banker, I'm used to people asking me for money and I don't want to go ask people for money. So they said, okay, don't worry, we've got all the money raised, all you have to do is run the bank. And I said, fine, you know, you got a deal, I'm gonna I'm gonna jump into this thing and I felt like I was really taking a huge risk leaving this good job and going and jumping into a startup at the time, Mhm And then we all remember what happened in 2008 came and the bottom fell out of the financial markets. And so all of these people that had said they were buying stock and we're going to contribute capital to the bank. We're no longer taking our phone calls and and the money evaporated to start this bank and so on. All of the group was like, well I guess, you know, we're gonna have to fold up our tents and I'm like, what do you mean fold up? I said, I'm all in, I can't fold up my tent, we have to open this bank. You know, So we continued, You know, to persevere and to actually we finally got it raised, it was like $12.5 million. We opened in January of 2009. And we were just one of the very last banks to open before...

...the F. D. I. C. Just shut down everything. But the moral of that story is the bank of florida that I felt so safe and secure at ended up failing two years later, Wow. So, you know, you just never know where you're safe and where you're not safe. And so I thought that was just as I reflect back on that, it turned out to be the best thing I ever did in my career was to leave that job, jump into this other group. That's a that's a fantastic story and a lot of lessons to learn from it. You know, it's, if we're going to continue to grow to grow from good to great to blaze new paths, we have to let go of the past, we can't get attached. And for years I've had this kind of loop in my head, I don't know where it came from, but it says attached to nothing detached from everything. And that has always been a kind of a guiding voice. If you will to focus on creating the new and being careful not to attach to where we've been, because it is safe, it is secure and I can't help but think two of One of my mentors along this journey, Dan Sullivan Who's been coaching entrepreneurs for about 40 years now, and he talks about, you know, we must always create a future that is bigger than the past and and that's where I want to come over to you, Kelsey, because you have done a lot of creation over the years uh, in your own journey. What what have you done to ensure that you're always creating a future bigger than your own past here with the steps that you've taken along the way to not get trapped into what I was talking about before? The Cave of complacency. I don't think anyone that knows me well, would think that I would ever fall into complacency. I have to do with or what I want to know and learn list or accomplish that is a mile long. So I I can't stand boredom and I'm always ready for what's next. Um you know, so I don't I don't fear getting too complacent because if I know what I'm doing that someone else's turn, I like to kind of figure things out and and and beyond that leading edge versus kind of getting into cycle. You you make an interesting point, this idea of a to do list, but then also a to learn list or I want to know list. I'm a big believer in lifelong learning because as you begin to learn new things, it opens up new horizons that those new horizons, you see new opportunities, what's on your to learn list right now, like what's the next big thing that you're wanting to learn and to to know about? So my next big move, I was going to be marrying what has been a passion and actually how I met keith on the pediatric cancer, I'm involved with the foundation that funds childhood cancer research. My to learn list is just, you know, biotech in general. I've been switching hats in between. I've had a art commission, uh a board meeting to learning biotech and I think I finally overwhelmed myself in short circuited. So I just went on a girls trip to have some wine and just got back to florida, so I could actually decompress from all the gear switching. Um but everything from the other side of this office is my arts and crafts room. So I've been learning our astrology, one of our boards favorite topics, you know, it's interesting, it's interesting you talk about this idea of biotech and I really feel that there's going to be a close correlation, there will be an intersection in the banking space with that and probably the next 5 to 10...

...years. Um, I don't know exactly what that looks like just yet, but I do see there might be some overlap between this idea of financial well being and physical, well being, mental, well being, they all kind of circle and go hand in hand together. You brought up an interesting point, Kelsey uh, and use the word fear. I know in the banking space a lot have spoken with me in private uh, when we think about digital growth and what's coming down and what's ahead there, a little intimidated. They're a little cautious. Um, and I wrote about in banking on digital growth of four fears. Fear of the unknown, Fear of change, fear of failure and and maybe even fear of success for someone who is listening and hearing your own stories and experiences so far. What recommendations might you be able to give to the dear listener for both of you on how to process some of this stuff in a positive manner, to essentially transformed fear into fuel for future growth instead of it being an impediment. There's no new venture that somebody would get into or no, no real change that somebody's going to engage in or risk that you're going to take, that doesn't create fear. And so fear is natural and you can't eliminate it. I think it becomes, I would use the word exhilarating, almost like being on a roller coaster or jumping off with a bungee cord or something, you know? So, so yeah, you're afraid when you do it, but once you do it, it's exhilarating and to succeed with it. And of course there was failure to, sometimes we try things. How many cars do we see at the F one race, you know, in Austin? I mean there was only one winner, right? But you have to believe every single one of those competitors was exhilarated just being in that race that day. So, I think a lot of it is about just embracing uh competition, embracing change and embracing just being engaged in in life and doing the things that you really feel compelled to do. It's a great point about failure. You know, I I look at failure as coming back to this point that you're mentioning before Kelsey failure is one of the greatest teachers. It's one of the greatest ways to learn continuously, particularly when working through an environment where there is rapid change. Um, failure is what I call the fertile seeds from which new growth springs and new, I'm curious Kelsey with, with your journey, where where have you used failure as a learning tool to manage change in a positive manner because like you said you not many people who know you would say, I don't know, she's she's one who's always, always learning, always growing, but but think back in your own mind and maybe what have been some of the greatest lessons that you've learned along the way when dealing with change, the biggest motivator to me has always been uh to prove people wrong, right, I feel that into how do you get over this obstacle? And so therefore when you think about failure, if you're trying one way and it's not working or you I do a lot of paying attention to what other people are doing and using kind of what hasn't worked or what's working over here, how do you apply it there? So I think that failure, I mean, if you can't get your point across, you can't get the team to believe in something, then you go prove it, solving that problem is fun and if it was easy, it wouldn't be as fun, you know, other people would be doing it. So I've always gotten a thrill out of Yeah, thinking about what's next and you know, even if you pay attention to what others are doing, even if the first approach isn't right, that's what makes the victory sweeter once you crack the code, there's that commonality that I'm hearing from, you...

...keith as well as the exhilaration, it's that roller coasters, that bungee jumping effect when it comes to going down a path like this, you know, one of the things that I think about a lot is getting comfortable feeling uncomfortable, how can that be practically applied in the banking space, what might there be some practices because keith back to your point over here, you know, you you've been through this journey, you had no choice but to succeed going forward because had you stayed where you were previously, it wouldn't have ended so brightly, but because you had the courage to commit and see that through, follow it through, there was a period of probably feeling a little uncomfortable, if not very uncomfortable from time to time, what what can others do to push through those feelings of, of uncomfortable to get to the other side of that, to get comfortable being uncomfortable. The things that I've been doing as I've learned more about how to handle some of the stresses and some of the and it's fair to call it stress, I guess change creates stress and and were naturally uncomfortable when things are changing. I don't think there's anybody who's totally comfortable and if you look at our industry For somebody who's been in this business for 30 years and to see the change in the last I tell people the last five years, things have changed more than in the previous 25 and that rate of change is not slowing, it's accelerating and so things are getting faster and faster and so I think you can really if you don't really consciously try to it really becomes self aware and to call most calm yourself you can really get caught up in this and you and I think a lot of people become so afraid of technological change and and it's almost like uh it can be overwhelming but you just have to really. I found meditation for me has just been so extremely helpful and I've gone from somebody who I thought I was always such a driven A. D. D. Type human when I was younger and now I never thought I would ever be able to meditate And I went from five minutes to 20 minutes to now my goal is to meditate an hour a day and I found it it's helped me so much to just be more present, more relaxed about things and enable able to listen better to people which I was never good at before. Either man. That's a that's that's a really practical thought. It's a practical idea is something that I've been writing and speaking about more of taking time to disconnect so that we can reconnect, reconnect first and foremost kind of like just with ourselves in our own minds even um Allison an episode 1 48 she literally ended the conversation talking about taking care of the mind um as as a key strategic competitive advantage, Kelsey thoughts to add on to that because I I see you shaking your head about this idea that when dealing and managing managing change, we must take care of the mind. Where's your thinking here? I mean I mindset is everything, I mean when you talk about how people might have fears of failure or uh who's your your biggest inner critic? Right? How do you silence that? So I think that you know when I was at the time, I was at Bank Director launching Finex Tech, which was a platform for banks and technology providers to come to the table and work together. And I just remember when one of the law firms that was one of our first sponsor signing on...

...is like and then here's this girl from Tennessee that thinks that she's just going to start this new company for based on Fintech and banks didn't care at that time, but I believed in her confidence that I had no idea how important this lawyer was or that she was thinking I'm just a girl from Tennessee, I'm I'm just doing what I said, I would do. You know, I just thought it was a good idea. So I just emailed her, so you're just kind of like sometimes to me it was the youngest of three left to my own devices a lot. So I never actually knew I was approaching things differently uh five taels for days, but I think sometimes that ignorance or perhaps just that you know, uh trying to do it without worrying about what other people are thinking and that that mind is your biggest advocate and to keep the point, I'm shaking my head because I'm a big sink tuition. That app is, it's a mind spa so I don't have any referral codes, it's just the best app I use for meditation and I'm big on, you know, just thinking about things. Um making sure that I get rest and then I take time to do art. If I'm doing a bunch of screen time, today's episode of banking on digital growth is brought to you by Nimbus who believes in creating even better financial services for all better access, better experiences, better value, all while supporting the entire customer journey. And how do they do this offering end to end niche banking solutions that you can buy or build, providing accountability beyond the technology and prioritizing impactful intentional innovation instead of chasing features ready to transform what is and create what's next, learn more at nimbus dot com, you've got to, you've got an outlet, you're taking time to disconnect to reconnect. And and now there's a common pattern here between the three of us because I literally just pull this up on on my phone over here. Now. Now here's the secret, I do not have email on my phone. I do not have social media, I do not even have an internet browser on my phone. I have a dumb smartphone that pretty much you can call text Gps and listen to podcasts. Now. I do have meditation app which is called My Life and you have a check in and right now I'm looking at it as good afternoon, How are you start your check in? And so it uses some guided questions to then get the right proper meditation. So now there's a common pattern between the three of us. This idea of taking care of the mind in a world of continuous change in a world where I think transformation will continue to happen in a more rapid pace. Let's take this thinking and continue forward with the conversation because there's some really practical things the dear listener can take away just learning from the two of you here as you move forward. Um as as you continue to blaze a new trail. And I I there was a there was a robert Frost poem that I'll never forget. 9th grade, I was sitting in English ap and it was right there on the wall in front of me. And it was the poem, Two roads diverged in a yellow wood and I took the one less traveled. And that has made all the difference. And I always remember thinking because there was one path that went to the right, there was one path that went to the left and being the curious mind and uh I wasn't so interested in the, in the past. I wanted to to blaze my own trail down the middle. I wanted to see what was there and go into that uncharted territory. So as you're continuing to blaze a new trail to, to launch locality digital community bank, focused on empowering the local business to maximize their growth um through an experience, a digital experience that is simple, empowering and personal keith, what was the inspiration here to launch locality? Why blaze this new trail to begin with...

...in the first place? So going back to the community banking and the power of community banking. I've always, so in my banking career, worked in big banks and then actually started working in the smaller community banks And then having started a community bank in 2009 and being able to through that bank safe, a lot of the local companies in our community during a time when funds were drying up and it was so satisfying to be able to do that. And these some of these companies had been In business for 40, 50 years, family businesses that were no longer able to get funds from there existing bank relationships, so that that felt so good. And then we sold that bank and then, you know, I got involved in another bank, did the same thing again, we sold that bank. And so the common denominator for me was really, you know, I would like to do this again, I don't necessarily want to sell the bank again, I want to tell our shareholder group this time, let's keep this going, let's take it public, because I think our community, and I tell people when I talk to investors about what we're doing, so you know, this is a good business, it's a great business really. If you run it right, banks can be really profitable investments, but I said it's more than that, it is also an investment in your community. When you, when you get involved in the community bank, you're helping the local economy, you're helping the local businesses, you're helping the smaller businesses. And the beauty of this is, you know, thank God, we have people like Kelsey who are involved with us now to understand technology and Corey Leblanc, who, you know, who's our chief technology officer, I mean, I never had people like this in my other banks, but I knew if we're gonna do this again, and we were going to really be able to help even more local businesses and hopefully someday local businesses in other localities, that we needed to be able to do that through technology, and that was the way we could do it and we could do it effectively. So very fortunate, so happy, you know, Kelsey is such a great thinker, I'm just sitting here. It was funny because before this happened because I was like, well do we have company notes? And I said, no, we don't have company knows we're not even a company yet. Absolutely, let's let's spend that over to to you, Kelsey because my my follow up question and keith, you've actually just set this up perfectly. So next time I'm gonna I'm gonna pass the mic over to you and let you host the show and I'm just gonna step out and take a look, I'm gonna go have lunch with my wife, you know, next time we do this and you can just run this thing because you've set this up so well, because my follow up question for you, Kelsey to this was what inspired you, what inspired you to join the board at locality, because to be honest, you know, keith, hearing you talk through and download your mind here. To me, I'm excited, I'm inspired and I see the bigger future that you're you're looking to create. But I'm curious to get your take on this Kelsey because you, like you said, you're you're bringing a unique perspective, You're bringing a unique experience here. What what what are your thoughts, what's your inspiration here? I mean if we heard what keith just talked about from a meditation standpoint to this, the way he looks at life? Yeah, it's not necessarily that common that you hear a ceo of bank that has that that way of thinking or the openness to wanting to try new things and forge a new path. So I'll say, you know, for me, I've been in community banking, I used to run education for directors of banks. So I thought, yeah, should know a little bit about being a director. But when you look at how to run a bank, I mean, what an exciting opportunity to get to start from the ground up to not have the legacy technology or all this existing, because that's the way we've always...

...done it, because there's not someone that started and you know, there's a handful of Lenovo's, but to be able to have this kind of Greenfield to build a bank from scratch with people that uh keith mentioned, uh Cory Live blog, like these people that have this vision that want to do it the right way. And then look at technology, not as we're not trying to replace all humans. We want to emphasize the relationship and we want to use tech to empower our team. I think there's something to attracting the right talent by having easier technology and having people be able to use their brains and have technology replaced some of the mundane, repetitive tasks and as we grow our our team for the bank property. I think that that same mentality tone starts at the top, and I think we all, I believe in what we're building You touched on purpose and I want to stay on that point in episode one, one of the things that came from that conversation was uh partnering around purpose, collaborating around purpose. I'm a big believer in purpose driven growth. I see purpose as a guiding light when it comes to creating something even bigger, better and brighter for those around us. And I'm curious to get your take on this keith, what role has purpose played for you? Um both in the work that you've done up to this point in baking, and I think even more importantly, what role will purpose continue to play through the work that you're doing, leading locality here. So the if you think about the comments that I made earlier about the community businesses, the local companies, that's a noble calling to be able to help entrepreneurs, to be able to help people create a business, be able to help somebody really fulfill their dreams. It's a calling that is, you can really get excited about that. You talk about purpose in terms of helping someone create a business and being a part of that. And so if I could elaborate on one other thing, we're going to do that, we really think is different. We want to be, if anybody can think of a time and everybody has been turned down for a loan at some time, right? Oh, it's anxiety, there's there's there's a lot of like anxiety that gets tied to that, and b I think, you know, we even see research to where like, small business owners won't apply for a loan or get trying to even get access to capital, because there comes back to what we were talking about before with fear it's fear of rejection. Right? And and a lot of people take take it personally, right? If their business doesn't get alone. Yeah. So we want to flip that around to really make that, not an experience where somebody rejects you, but where somebody says, let me help you. You've got a great idea, open your account with us, we're going to continue to monitor your cash flow and we're gonna work with you on a monthly basis. Now we're gonna be able to do that one on one with every business because we need, it just does not cost effective, right? But with technology we can do that. We can reach out with data and we can say to that person, we're watching your cash flow, hey, guess what? Once this, once your receivables get to this level and your sales get to this point, you know, all you have to do is this and this, Then we'll be able to give you $100,000 loan. So keep up the good work, keep the deposits coming in and encourage them to grow and to, you know, who does that? Now I don't, nobody does. Uh it's more like, you know, the bank sits back and and you're rejected and it's a horrible experience. So I think there's a lot of opportunity and and if you think about...

...it, who are the businesses that need the most help, the smaller local companies don't have power, they're beholden to the banks and so we want to be able to make that a much more pleasurable experience. And so that's our purpose really. We looked at our community and we saw that that was a problem during P. P. P. That the local companies were not getting funding and that was a lot of the inspiration for the bank, but if it's happening here it's happening throughout America and we know that it is because they're just so fewer humanity banks than there used to be the words once again, I mentioned dan Sullivan before but he just wrote a new book and released it. I we we talked about this in episode 1 36 called The Gap in the Gain and one of the things that he talks about is it's so important to measure progress, the progress that we're making by looking behind it, where we've been and I like your idea like you're thinking around using technology as a tool to provide that guidance, to provide that accountability, to provide that coaching, to provide even that encouragement because it is so different. Starting a business is hard. Running a business is even harder because back to your point to bring this almost full circle keith, you talked about, there's other areas that come into play, families, kids other relationships that all we have to think about with this and it's something that we just can't do alone and that's why you know, collaboration collaboration is another big thing that has been coming through this these podcast conversations and even even the idea of the noble calling, I've heard that come up in a few recent conversations to bringing the nobility back I think to banking because it is it is a noble uh part that we can play. I'm curious, Kelsey, you've, you've been helping and working with companies, helping them to understand the value of partnerships, creating connections to to solve versus cell and through your experience, how has how does connections through collaborations create a clear path for growth when thinking about just where you're at and what you're seeing with locality here, everyone knows you want to work smart, not hard or find people that are complementary. I mean I think that's what you saw at the beginning of when Fintech came out, there was there was fear there was so fight coming out and all of a sudden banks are going to be the next blockbuster but so you have tech companies that are building tools that they've never heard of anything about regulation or worked at a bank, but they think they've created a better experience yet, they don't actually have the distribution of the banks. So when you look at uh you know, you will get complimentary talents and you think banks have distribution, but there is a need for a better experience, why don't we put them at the table so that they can actually learn from each other. Um That goes back to the constant learning. I never want to be the smartest person in the room. You want to find the way that you can put the right, it's probably what I spend most of my time doing um is connecting my friends to each other and I tell them I don't know much but I know a lot of people that may know that answer and then I can put the right people together on that. So I mean it's definitely, yeah I could be a little kumbaya but I definitely think that the when you look at um scarcity like the mindset of abundance versus scarcity when you're coming from a place of fear, you may not want to work together because you think there's only one pie. Um but when you're able to kind of join forces makes life easier and better for those around and technology provides that capability. Like never before I think of a conversation that I had going back to episode 69. We're talking about who not how I think a lot of times when we think about growth and doing something new, the mind goes to how are we going to do X. Y. R. Z. And that creates some...

...limitations because we only know what we know but when we begin to think who who do we need to help us, you know solve this problem, eliminate this roadblock, capture this new opportunity, achieve this goal and we think who first back to your point, Kelsey connections, it's the mind opens up to new connections that will help to shortcut our learnings to gain new capabilities quickly. And keith, that's what you've been doing with with Nimbus as well on this journey through a collaborative model, what has that collaboration looked like so far in regards to just short cutting things speed, um gaining new capability and really just just moving forward with courage and confidence. Well, Nimbus has been just an amazing partner force they have and we're going at this kind of together because when we first got into conversations with them but we recognize that they have a lot of the consumer banking applications, but that the commercial lending pieces were we're really not fully developed yet. And so we have partnered together with them with our bankers, working together with their software engineers and coders to create new products that are so amazing and will enable us to really differentiate ourselves in the market so that partnership it wouldn't be possible for and I'll say another thing that with not only do they provide the technology, but Nimbus has provided us with marketing, they provide us with social media, they provided us with, they've set up our website, so they have just done so many, they brought I tell people they brought world class talent to a startup organization and so I mean I'm just so uh impressed with what they've been able to do for us and that's that collaboration once again to where you're gaining capability and increasing speed versus having to try to figure out and do, it's like what you said, Kelsey don't want to be the smartest person in the room. We want to align ourselves with others who know even more so that we can all grow together. This has been a fantastic conversation with you both today, appreciate the knowledge, the thinking that you have shared. I want to get real practical here at the end to help the dear listener to educate, to empower the dear listener to continue to move forward and make progress along their own digital growth journey and all growth begins with something small. A simple step. Um what would that small, simple step you could make a recommendation around so that they can move forward based upon what we've talked about today, Kelsey, what would you recommend the dear listener do next? Something small to, to to take those next steps forward. Um something small. That is kind of corny, but a book that I've been reading recently, it's called the Hi Fi, I think it's called High Five Life. Uh but it talks about the science and uh what happens when you high five yourself in a mirror and it's this positive reinforcement that it's impossible to have a negative thought. Well when you high five yourself or someone, but there's this innate, you know, it's definitely like a mood booster and so yeah, I kind of laughed it off at the beginning um but they do something called the high five challenge or you high five yourself, you guys can look it up, you can sign up and get news like that, it's a free little email reminder, it's fairly a big movement um and it's just a cool concept because when you think about just What's a small thing you can do, you can try the five day high fiving thing. I'm on day four uh at least makes me laugh because I feel embarrassed and by myself thinking this is weird, I don't, I'm gonna tell you...

...why there's science like you said, it's starting to show, we're really bring this full circle now back to the brain and meditation and mind set here when dealing with exponential change that can feel confusing and scary and overwhelming. It all comes back to keith, what you're talking about awareness and the mind can only hold a positive or a negative thought or emotion, definitely go back and listen to the conversation that I had with dan Sullivan about the gap and the gain because that's what that's one of the big things, it's so easy to fall into the gap and I use acronyms. The gap is where you gripe about problems, to where if you're continuously focusing on what's been going? Well where have you been winning? What are you excited about? What have you learned? What are you looking forward to? You can program the mind to really be in a state of positivity to be in a state of abundance which are then directly correlated with growth. So not corny, corny at all. Really, really practical. What was that book again for the dear listener? The High five Life, The High Five Life? I'm a big reader, I'm going to get it myself. That's not correct. It's very close to that, Kelsey, That's a great, that's a great one, keith. What about you? What what's a recommendation that you can send the dear listener off for something practical, something small that they can continue to grow with. So I'm also going to throw a book out That. And this is a book that is a very short read. It's probably like 45 pages long and you can read this in 2030 minutes. And that's the beauty of it. And it's called as a man Thinketh. Uh have either of you read that book? Are you familiar with it? No, but I've got two books that I'm gonna have to go and annoy my wife with now to get another package from amazon? So as a man Thinketh, Yes. And so I just bought this book actually for my daughter yesterday because I was telling her about it. So Uh and another book I was ready? They were talking about this? So this book was written around 1900, so it's an old book and but it was, it's beautifully written and it was probably one of the first books that set the stage for as you're talking about how how the mind is so important to what we become and therefore the title of the book and how we think and not just how we create our lives, but how through thinking positive thoughts and it's a very simple, beautiful, beautifully written book, but how our thoughts really create are the entirety of our life. So I would really recommend that book to anybody. And like sometimes I'll read it before I go to bed and you can finish it that quickly and you just you know, I have beautiful dreams that night after you read that that book. It's just that uh wonderful, that's that's really been a big interesting study area of study for me personally, coming back to the point Kelsey of always being a lifelong learner, always having not a to do list, but it's a learn list is the impact of the mind in relationship to to the future and literally like creating the future self. And back to the point of the conversation that you started with keith, we have to let go of the past so that we can create that space to create the new going forward. Thank you both for such a wonderful conversation today. If someone wants to continue the conversation with either one of you, what's the best way for them to reach out and say hello, what's the best way for them to connect and maybe even collaborate. I'm easy to find linkedin message or twitter or emails. I don't know, I'm pretty, I'm pretty findable. Just just just google Kelsey, just google Kelsey, weaver linked linked in. There you go. Yeah, Lincoln is good. I mean my email address is keith at...

...locality bank dot com. It's pretty predictable. Got it. Well, this is, this has been a great conversation, thank you both again for joining me on another episode of banking on digital growth. This has been a lot of fun today. Thank you. Thank you as always. And until next time be well, do good and make your bed. Thank you for listening to another episode of banking on digital growth with James robert, ley brought to you by nimbys who is on a mission to bring the people process and technology together to create new routes to growth for financial brands and enable them to deliver outcomes to learn more about how you can collaborate with Nimbus to maximize your future digital growth potential visit www dot nimbus dot com. Until next time be well and do good.

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