Banking on Digital Growth
Banking on Digital Growth

Episode · 1 year ago

26) #ExponentialInsights: Adapting to Hard, Fast Change w/ Dr. Benjamin Hardy

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

You can't predict the future.

But as Warren Buffett said, "Twenty years from now, everything's gonna be better than it has ever been."

In times like these, how do we adapt to hard, fast change in a way that creates a positive future for ourselves and our families?

On this episode of the Banking on Digital podcast, Dr. Benjamin Hardy, father of five and author of Personality Isn't Permanent, talked about how to adapt to hard, fast change.

We discuss:

-Why you need a future that gives your life purpose

-The reason personality tests are a terrible way to hire

-The process of imagination and decision making

You can find this interview, and many more, by subscribing to Banking on Digital Growth on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or here.

The shortert list, the more simple andthe more simple the higher the motivation and the higher thelikelihood that you'll do it. You were listening to banking ondigital growth, with James Robert Lay, a podcastat in powers, financial brandmarketing sales and leadership teams to maximize their digital growth potentialby generating ten times more loans and deposits. Today's episode is part ofthe exponential inside series, where James Robert Interviews, the industry'stop marketing sales and FINTEC leaders sharing practical wisdom toexponentially elevate you and your team. Let's get into the shel greetings inhello and welcome to the twenty sixth episode of the banking on digitalgrowth. PODCAST, where I James Robert Lay your digital anthropologistscontinued to commit to simplify the biggest digital marketing and sellstrategies that Wen power you and your financial brand to generate ten timesmore loans in deposits in this postcoved world as we work together. Today's episode is part of theexpidential insight series and I'm excited to welcome Dr Benjamin Hardy,to the show, because of the work that he's doing as an organizationalpsychologist and the inch sites that he has shared in his new book. Personalityisn't permanent Doctor Hardy is an organizational psychologist and thebest selling author of willpower doesn't work. His blogs have been readby over a hundred million people and are featured on Forbes Fortune C NDB CCheddar, big tink among many others dor hardy, is a regular contributor to incand psychology today and from thousand and fifteen to t o twesnty eighteen, hewas the number one writer in the entire world on medium dtcom. He and his wifeLorn live in Orlando and have adopted three children through the fostersystem in February twenty eighteen and then just one month later, laurenbbecamepregnant with twins who were born in December of twenty eighteen, Hello Bengood. To have you on the show today, great to me, Wityo James. You know Ithought my wife and I had it tough when we welcomed our four kids to our family,but that was in five years that you you, you had a bit faster pace of addingfive kids yeah. I think you said Wa and we were talking just about twelvemonths yeah and we did have the older three Osfoster kids for a few years, and we fought the legal system with no clearexpectation, only a lot of faith, an hope that we would eventually adoptthem. But then you know the adoption just happened.Suddenly, just booms, some of the laws in South Carolina changed we're able toget the kids and then, a month later sound out. We were you know we werepregnant with twins so yeah at twenty...

...eighteen. We adopted three and hadtwins. It was a Itwas, a big ear and Wewe're big on adapting to hard fastchange. Let's talk about that adapting tohardfast change, because you know that's something that we're all havingto do right now in this post covert worlds, we're trying to pick through it,but first one of the things that I'm just curious about is what is good foryou right now in this kind of this new normal we're trying to work throughtogether, an otherwise chaotic time of crisis. I'm always one who's, justtrying to find something at least hopeful to begin a conversation withwhat's good for you what'. What do you excited about sited about a lot ofthings I mean? Obviously we have five kids. You know when you really breakdown everything going on like yeah there's going to be a lot ofinteresting stuff, that's nonpredictable, but as far as myself,like I've spent a lot of great time with my kids, my schedule honestlydidn't change that much. I think tha one thing that did change hat. Iprobably didn't travel four or five times that I would have travelled just'cause. I can't those events and things like that e were dropped, but for me I've spent a lot of time, JoFoci on my bigger goals, my spiritual goals and than my family, a as far asmy career goals, and so like everything's great. For me I mean I I'ma big BELIEVR. I mean I recently listened o even to Waran Buffet, youknow and warn buffet simply said, can't preduce the future in any specific timeframe. But I can tell you in twenty years, wher now everything's Coun bebetter than it is ever been. I kind of like that. Just long term futureperspective, and I think that you know I actually recently read man search formeeting. Have you heard that one a y in answers fo me Victor Frankl,Yeah Yeah I've picked through it. You got to read it. You got to really readit like it's so timely for right now, but one of the big things yeah.Obviously the books about the holocost and like all the Jews and the Germanconcentration camps, and one of the things that Frankel found was. Is thatlike, unless you had a future that gave yourlife purpose, your present was meaningless and so, like the peoplesuffering had no purpose, and so they would die, though in th moment theylost a purpose, and so like it's essential to enjoy the present, even nomatter how difficult it is. You have to have a future. It's like it's essentialfor human psychology. So, like I think that that's really what's getting methrough, it mean my wife have a huge future that goes way beyond covet.Nineteen was was Frankel. His is his present like something that he wasfocusing on. It was wasn't it a tree outside of his cell. If I recall crrickwell I mean he was. He was really focused on his future, like he was. Hehad his present head meeting. I mean he was. He was just doing things likeother. You know other Jews that were in the concentration camp. He would dohard labor, like just he was doing all sorts of medial tasks that they wereforced to do, but he found a way to his suffering had meaning because he had afuture with driving for and so like. He was able to turn his suffering intospiritual development or personal development because he saw himself inthe future teaching lectures and he saw...

...himself writing books like so he had afuture that gave him a purpose which gave his life meaning, and I think thatyou know he talks about how a lot of the Jews at the time like they wouldall look. They all had something to hope for like they would hope for likegetting out on Christmas, just as one example and hell Christmas would comeand go and they wouldn't get out they'd all start dying, 'cause like theirfuture disappeared. I think you know in times like these, it's essential tokeep your eye on the future 'cause. Then it gives all of this meaning, andso for me, like me, and my wife, like we've, got a huge vision spiritually,but also I have huge vision for my work, and so it's like it allows you to deal with this in adifferent way. You know I like to dance holen quote the bigger the future, thebetter the present, so it's just like you can handle things if you've got ameaning and a purpose to do so. If you don't have a many a purpose to do so,you can't handle very much yeah and I'm seeing a lot of that that thinkingaround it to to come back to DANC Sullivan, always make your futurebigger than your past. I'm seeing a lot of that right now, with what we'reexperiencing in financial services being forced into a digital first likebusiness model where up to this point, a lot of this has still been rooted inlegacy built around branches, the physical world broadcast, and it's veryhard for some to make that shift transitially, just in their mind yetalone, to make it an actual reality. I've been following your work now for awhile, you and I were talking m before we hit record, but will power doesn'twork? It was a gift from from then and strategic coach and normally on aflight back from Toronto. I'm goingto be probably watching something. Just'cause I've been doing deep thinking for the course of a day, and I don'twatch T V or anything but like that's the only kind of quote Qute time that Igive myself to do something like that, but I remember getting on that planeand opening up that book and just diving into it, highlighting it andlike wow. This is this is some interesting stuff and then now you havea new book. That's out personality isn't permanent. That I know, will justit'll extend upon what I think what the world needs rightnow, because, as you opened up that book, you shared a story how a personalitytest almost um it it had. A big negative impact, hadthe potential to have a negative impact on your future. But you didn't let it,but I want to start the conversation there. Can You unpack that story ofthat personality, test, N N and the negative ramiifications it could havehad on a very important relationship? Yeah, it's Kinda funny. I didn't evenknow that that story was going to go in the book. To be honest with you likethat story got like bolted in near the last minute 'causewe were trying to find like the right hook or the right story to begin it,and I I didn't think about that someone. It was like the book's not really Abatpersonality test so much, but this there is obviously a big aspect of thatin the book. But anyways back when I was in college, I was dating Laren the person who ended up becomingmy wife, but a big popular personality...

...test of the time was called the colorcode. Obviously, there's myros Briggs INIA gram disk. All these big tests,but color code was a similar format, basically breaks people up into fourgroups and we took the test 'cause Laryen really liked it. Her family tookthe test seriously to stop people through the perspective of the test andwhen they found out that I was a white according to the color code, they werereally concerned about Lawren dating me and getting married to me. The reasonis is that whites, according to the color code, are very like passive,Aloof, non committed like very much in their head, and you know dreamers butnot goal setters like not not effective. People M. You know on the broadspectrum and Laren had previously been in a very abusive marriage like forthree years. She was a rough marriage and Laren and her whole family kind ofsaw themselves as breds according to to tests and reds are like type focuse.Gogo go and Laren had been an am an abusive marriage with a guy who wasalso a red. According to the Color Code and obviousty, the guy was sodominating so abusive, so destructive that it kind of turned larn into ashell of herself, and so when she left a marriage, she went and traveled for ayear served a church mission. She was, she spent several like two or threeyears kind of like reestablishing herself as a human being after that,and I was the first person she dated and when her parents found out that Iwas a white, they were like okay, I know what Larn's up to like. Shedoesn't want to be in a situation where she can be so dominated again, so she'sdating this Whit, who is a passive, aloof character, who she can thencontrol and dominate the situation, and they were L in their ki of apatriarchcal family. So they're like I, mean they're, really open on equalground, but they were very much like you got to marry a real guy like justbecause you're afraid of what happened in the past and you don't want to bedominated. You can't just get into a relationship that you feel is safe.With this white, like you need a real man, you still need someone who'sserious like who can help lead and guide a situation, and so they were alllike. You should probably not marry this guy. Even if he's a good dude likeyou need to find. Probably someone who's a real man. Well, I thought I was pretty prettyinteresting to be honest with you. From that perspective, you know I can relate to that, because my wi, mywife and I we we knew each other in high school. We were friends, actuallyhad a crush on her next door neighbor and we had a a freshman English class firstday of high school, Miss Bungos, and so her nextoor neighbor actuallyintroduced us and then fast for d. four years later, we're in freshmen incollege and who's, my freshman English class. Again it's Delena and Um like I fell fast for her and M, I'm,like I told her n Eightee, I'm going to marry you. She goes you're crazy. Isaid no, I'm going to marry. You just watch and let e say that's re greatawesome. Well, so she's like she's, Lebanese andUm, it was like y talk about pay,...

CIAOCHOL familis. It was one of thesituations that Um her dad. You know, did it youere eithermarried or you were engaged so like we had abike. As about a sixand a half, your formal courtship, holy cow and Um, like her sister, would comeand hang out with us like if we'd go to the movies or something and it was likeduring the day you know MOMS at home we go grub a bite for lunch and it's coolUm, but the first time that I asked for her her hand in marriage. Her Dad toldme no so hearing hearing that story from you like and having that type typeof a conflict. I'm like man it it's good to know that like 'causethe struggles worth it there's beauty in the struggle- and he said you're tooyoung, you need to t t to focus on your schools 'cause I it was still Um OnmyUndergrad, but then I was going to go. Do My MBA and my business was was justgetting started and I said okay, I'm going to come and talk to you in sixmonths and six months later he comes back. I come back to MIS Mister Dal atI'd like to marry your daughter. He says no thes second time, and Iremember I slammed my hand on the table. I looked him Strai an as Sai Mister Dow.I respect you. I respect your family. Please respect me. I respect yourdaughter, please respect what we went and he set back. He wiped his hands. Hesaid. Ok, you can marry my daughter, so it was one of those things that it'slike hearing that and I prove yourself kindof yeah yeah, an and ot with my kids. I think I'm going to do the the sameexact thing you mentioned that the book is notabout personality tests. I think that's very clear and it's important to makethat distinction, but you note that test like disk, myrs, Briggs, they're,unscientific and they'. They might even be harmful, which I didn't know thatthis was a two billion dollar industry. So unpacked aut a little bit for me.How might test like Disk Marge Briggs be harmful to someone I mean you got agreat story, but can you get a little bit deeper into that yeah? Definitely Iwill say my story 's a great example of someone who was viewed in very limiting terms, thesame type of thinking that goes into these categorical stop personality testwhich, by ther way, is not how psychologists few people and it's avery terrible way to hire as an example like if you're hiring the Myers breaks,the disk can't predict performance, you could have five people that are ds andthey could all be completely different Y. U N W like ththey're a terribleperformance scale, but also they're, just not how people actually work, but how manypeope, how many people make hies today base upon at I think of of so many HRdepartments ar are like rooted in the type of thinking, yeah they're, thelowest absolute lowest grade of measurement tool th. They woulddefinitely not be considered good science from like a psychologicalperspective, and I had to learn that...

...over and over and over becoming anorganization. Al Psychologist, someone whois literally professionaly trainedin methods of hiring culture, leadership, et Cetera, like they were,like, don't hire base on those test in Oneco. This test are not Valad ar norreliable scales but whith that type of stinking the whole black and white,like Youre, you're, red you're, blue you're, yellow that type of stinking isliterally the same kind of thinking that goes into honestly raicism andthings like that, like you put people into a category, and you assume thateveryone from that in group has certain characteristics ever and out, but asidefrom not being PSYC Ecido, not be ing good science, they lead outsiders to view a person in verylimiting simplistic ways, and they lead you as a person to view yourself invery limiting ways. So, like I'm more interested in what the test does for me,is a human being. If I take a test- and I take the test seriously, what doesthat do to my mindset? What does T at due to my identity? There's a lot ofresearch out of Harvard from Allan Langer she's been studying mindfulnessfor several decades she wrote a book called Mindfulness, nypu calledcounterclacqwase. I need to read those books, but when you have a label thatyou've taken seriously, you become ignorant of every aspect. You know youbecome mindless to when the Labelis, not true in psychology. We haveselective attention. We cunly focus on so many things at once. Like I, youknow there there's even research like if you come from a different country,you're, going to notice things perceptionally that you wouldn't notice.If you're you know, we see the world toug a lens and when you have a label,you see you see the world through, that Lens Labels Create Tunnel Vision, andso what what ELN langer has found is is that like, for example, someonebelieves they're depressed, they believe they're always depressed, eventhough there's many times strarted day when they're, not, and so when someonebelieves they're an introvert as an example, they'll think that they'realways an interver when in many occasions they would actually reflectsomeone who is really great with people. They just only focus on that becausetheyve define the label so much and when you define a label en it becomesan aspect of your identity. You then seek to defend the label. You seek toconfirm it. You do anything and everything you can to confirm it. Youridentity, narrative, which is basically the way you explain yourself, is invery definitive terms and there's a lot of research at this point out ofHarvard, and I would point people to Daniel Gilbert's work. Ye gave a greatted talk called the psychology of your future self, but basically this is kindof a cognitive bias that people have basically the ideas I that we overvalueour present perspectives. We actually think that who we are today is who wealways will be truth is you're not the same person. You are five or ten yearsago, an in the future you're not going to be the same person. You are todayand if you, if you begin a process of thinking about who you want to Einthefuture and using that is the basis of your identity, then what you want to dois ultimately you want to stop holding so tight to your current self, butthese tests, these tests lead you to a very fixed mineset about yourself, andso I think that these come with a lot more problems than benefits, and it's it's ultimately not that useful tobe so definitive. Ind, how you explain yourself so fix mindset, labels, tunnelvision, thinkit's, like...

I see where this can hold people back like assume that I'm a financial brandleader working in the bearing space, I've built my entire career for thelast twenty years on a model built around the physical world of branches,brick and water, something I can see n Tuch. I can feel, but the challenge that I'm having isthat future that I know I need to create like philosophically I'mstruggling, because I can't bridge that gap. In my mind, technology has transformed our world,and digital has changed the way consumers shot for and buy financialservices forever. Now consumers make purchase decisions long before theywalk into a branch if they walk into a branch at all, but your financial brandstill wants to grow loans and deposits we get it. Digital grows can feelconfusing, frustrating and overwhelming for any financial brand marketing andsales leader, but it doesn't have to because James Robert wrote the bookthat guides you every step of the way along your digital growth journey visit,www, dot, digital growth, docom to get a preview of his best selling bookbanking on digital growth, or order a copy right now for you, and your teamfrom Amazon inside you'll find a strategic marketing manifesto that waswritten to transform financial brands and it is packed full of practicalandprovent insight. You can start using today to confidently generate ten timesmore loans and deposits. Now back to the show. How does personality playinto some of that thatstruggle you mentioned, like I'm, viewing myself this way, but what arthe the way that I might be able to help break free from the past? That'skind of informing my present so that I can be free to create something bigger,better and brighter MHM yeah. I think tha. The goal isactually that the past isn't such an extreme predictor of the future unlessyou're really really happy about your past, but en even then, we've alreadytalked about you know before this meeting is' s, sometimes just because the past of successfuldoesn't mean that's what you should hold on to you know. As one examplelike I was a topwriter, I was Lee top writer on MEM ack com for years andthat could become a status or an identity that I overattached to whichthen can like limit what needs to happen in the future. It's that wholeidea. What got you here won't get you there, but obviously your questions more tothe idea of. Maybe you know issues in the past ere just er just patterns thatare so easy to fall into right. From my perspective, identity is much moreimportant of a concept than personality identity is how you define yourself andyourself concept is usually the thing that predicts your behavior and yourbehavior over time is what ultimately shapes your personality. It's importantfor people to realize thike personality...

...is a not inate. Inflexible traitpersonality is context. Tol youshow up differently and basically in differentpersonas and different roles and different environments, but also yourpersonality does in fact change over your lifetime, whether you do anythingabout it like there's a lot of what's called longitudnal research on thesubject where it's like your personality is not going to be the samewhen your fourte is one fifty like you're, going to be different, crisgoing to have gone through many things, and so, rather than worrying so muchabout personality, especially your current personality. There's a lot ofresearch now on the idea of your futureself, like the person youultimately want to be in the future and to me this is a really important andinteresting realm of research. There's a lot of you know. There's been a lotof study on the idea that the number one death bed regret that people haveis that they didn't have the courage to be the person they wanted to be.Instead, they lived up to the expectations of the norms of thoseround them, whatever personor environment they had already created,you know, and basically, when you're, just being who you've been yesterday,you're living on auto pilot, you're, being so caunscious, you're, just kindof being reactive to ou environment, and we all want to make changes in ourlives. We all want to make improvements whether it's ourselves is aleaderwether, it's our business, whether it's our finances, whether it'sour family, whether it's Ourhealth, we all want to make improvements. WhatDaniel Gilbert found it Harvard is that the reason people don't make suchimprovements is because they spend way more times thinking about their pastthan imagining and creating a new future, and one of the other problemsis that people think that who they are today is who they ultimately alwayswill be. That's not only not true, but it stops you from actually thinkingabout the person you want to become, and that's actually way more importantand that's a process of imagination and decision making that we can all startinto so taking time to write, to journal tojust put, Pin ta paper on who I want to become who I want my organization tobecome there's a lot of value that can be created from that type of anactivity. Is that what I'm hearing from you, latsTis first step, is taking the time to actually think about it. It's importantto realize that your futureself, your future self. As a decision you makeit's not a discovery that you make it a decision who do we want to be Orwhodo?I want to be that's the first step. I think that, like think about it from aniddiction standpoint, you know that someone's Rade Oer in a commonaddiction when they start becoming public about it like they start tellingpeople look, I've got a problem rit. I want to make a change. Now I'm ready tostop defending my my my present, I'm Gread, to stop justifying my present byblaming the past. I'm willing to admit that where I'm at right now is notwhere I want to go and I'm ready to move forward in my life, so that onceyou've actually started to find your future self and I'm not speaking likeeveryone's n, an attic, I'm saying the first, this first step is actuallydefining. Who you want to be, I think, actually using like a one to three.Your timeline is really great. Two to three years is really great like. Wheredo I want to be in two to three years from now in my situation, maybe in myfinances and my relationships in my environment and just definding, who youwant to be the next step is honestly from the perspective anatic tellingpeople about it, owning the fact that...

...this is where you want to go ratherthan pretending that you're completely justified n, who you are today, it'ssaying this is where I want to go. This is it's like letting the cat out o back.You know, but that that telling people about who you want to be in the futurethen leads you to becoming a lot more accountable to becoming that personAlledou to having a desire to be consistent with that new story. Itclerifies your environment, there's a lot O and there's many steps evenbeyond telling people about it, but that that's a carage o step that peopleneed to take. You know it's interesting. You use the words taking the time tostop and think like you're, not doing that every day, then your future's, notthat important to you. I I I think about the financial brandteams, the marking teams, the cells teams to leadership teams that I'mworking with, and we do that like every ninety days and and it's built intoeven ar what I call the digital growth operating environments. There's four ofthem: There's he the learning aspect, there's the thinking aspect, there'sthe doing aspect and then there's the reviewing in the reflection aspect,which then transitions back into more learning, more thinking even betterdoing, and it just builds. It's like an upward sporal built upon itself. But Isee so many marketing team cells teams, leadership teams struggle they getstuck in the doing of the work that it's very hard for them to create thatspace, an time to just think just pause. What is something practical that youcould recommend? 'cause like I'm, seeing this as one who works indigital there's, a lot of distractions built into digital, the dings, thebuzzes, and it's almost like we create this false sense of. I need to be ontwenty four seven, but even after being in coach myself, those free days justtwenty four hours of just nothing silence. In my mind, that is but, but Iliterally do digital detoxes on those days. It's super important yeah. When youwere talking as ing about T U- and I think it comes from the book- The roadless stupid- I could be wrong. But basically you know people sometimes arerunning enthusiastically in the wrong direction and it feels good to brunning enthusiastically. But you got to kind of ask yourself your going inthe right direction and I think, if you're not taking the time to stopreflect, you know I'm kind of reminded of the idea of airplanes. Honestly,like airplanes, you know from what from what I've heard like they spend anenormous amaunt of flight time off course, because of wind pressure andlike TURBULENC and stuff, like they're, constantly being nudged off course, butthey have an innertial guidance system so that every like literally every fewseconds, I think they're course correcting, because if they weren'tcourse correcting regularly, they wouldn't get to the destination on timewhich they usually do so like the idea is, is if you're off even a matter ofone or two degrees for a long enough period of time you could be hundreds ofmiles off your destination and so, from my perspective, taking the time tothink and reflect into journal andto...

...like reassess your vision, reassessyour direction. REASSESSD your process, Lik reinces, your priorities like, ifyou're not doing that, then it's essentially like you're an airplane.You don't know how. Of course, you actually are and the longer you're offcourse the longer the opportunity cost to getting back. You know it reminds meof the Qute from cubby as far as like it doesn't matter how many steps Yhoutake up the ladder if it's facing the wrong wall. No, no! You! Now! Thisbrings up t the DANCELS nqal progress starts by telling the truth, but Ithink from a very practical standpoint, kind of like you having regular dayswhere you take the day off and you like literally give yourself the space tothink creativity like they say that sixteen percent of creative ot ideashappen while you're at work. The rest will happen while you're recoveringresting. You know in the shower on vacation, but even more like justtaking ten fifteen minutes in the morning before you jump into your phoneto just journal about your future self, about your goals about your team. Ifyou do it in the right environment, where Yo fom me, I just do it in my carthere's no there's no distractions! In My car, I have my phone Onr, my phoneon airplane mote. I might be listening to like some soft piano music, butother than that. I just have me and my journal straight up and I just writeabout what I'm trying to accomplish and who I'm trying to be, and this isliterally how you can train your selective attention. You can train yourbrain to focus on the things that you're trying to accomplish and whenyou're in that environment, especially, I would say first T in in the morningyour brain is far more likely to come up with creative solutions, and if youdo that on a daily base, it should be getting solutions and be able to takeaction on thes solutions that will change your life in business. If you'renot doing that, then how many days of misd creative solutions did you missyeah, you know hearing you talk through this, creating up space, creating thattime to stop pause, think right about what future you're wanting to create. Is it something that someone can do bythemselves or is it helpful to have, and we almost use the wordaccountability before having an accountability partner to do thistogether with or have someone to fall back on just 'cause? It's so easy toget back stuck in that loop of just continuously doing runningenthusiastically an the wrong direction, as you said, but but is it important tohave someone at least just to check in Um it's UST incredibly important yeah,I mean th, I rote a blockpost. Actually, it was very well received about evendaily accountability, like one of the things that, like I've done for a along time is like I'll. Have someone that I literally send two TEX messagesto a day takes less than a minute I'll. Send him the three things I'm trying toaccomplish today and then, at the end of day, I'll give them a score one outof two one out of three two o three or three ff literally. That's it and likebeginning of the day I'll get tax, Orim he'll get atecor me it's just a list ofthree bullets and a day and like that's, I mean obviously the Naybe we'll dolike a weekly phone callor, a monthhey like get together and have an a siebaland like talk about it but yeah I mean, I think that that's just one way I meanthe more accountability you embed into your life and environment in the formof someone. You can openly talk to Abyour struggles and also your goalsand someone who can you can report to...

...that's, keep it also, just in general,having an environment that expects you to become the person you strive to bebecause you're very aware of it you're telling them about it and they expectyou to become that person. I mean the more your environment reflects yourfutureself, the better that right there, you just teck someone the three thingsthat you're going to get accomplishe that day and then you kind of follow up. Why three things 'cause? I think that'sso practical and I think that those three things are key, but why justthree things 'cause? I think I think about my wife. She has this huge Todulist of all these activities every day and like no just wriht down three, butwhy three thinks I mean? Obviously we all do more than three things a day,but I think you know this is focused on important overurgent. I would havethese three things be what you would consider important things that wouldn'tbe on your to do list anyways. Obviously, you've got a hundred thingson you to do Liss. These are three things that could easily be lost in themaze of business and not seen for months. A big part of this whole futureself process is it's about focusing on the things that are important to you.That will move your life forward. You don't need to have a future self ifyou're, just going through your urgent day to day busy life like you, can justwake up, go to work and be the person you are today. The idea of creating afuture self in in upgrading your life is about doing things that aren't inyour busy schedule, they're about creating space that you can do one tothree things that are clearly moving your life in the right direction,whether it's developing a skill pitching yourself to like a newaudience or just whatever it is like it couldn't be going to the gym. Like youget to decide what those one to three things are, but I think I think threeis just a good number. I mean it's just not too big. I think the idea it islike what are just a few things that, if you accomplished you'd, consider theday is success and these one o three things should clearly refret selectwhere you're going not what you're already too busy doing the list shouldbe short yeah and that helps decrease some omentum for the next day, whichcontinues to fuel future progress and, as Dnsullivan says, progress, notperfection Ecause, I think you know, for especially this is coming from atype A personality. I have to be ver, you know what it's okay like and giveyourself that grace. You know what tomorrow's he new day. I can try againand it's not failure, but it's progress right, yeah and simplicity is whatcreates motivation so like if you've got fifty things on your to do list.That creates what we call decision, fatigue, yeals, Nart, to be stressedout by the list and then you'll have to inso like one to three things. You knowI mean honestly, one may be better if you could prioritize. What's the onething that absoately must happen, I would rather you get. One thing done,then: have three things on your list and have zero of them get done. Youknow so like this is about prioritizing important ofrirgin like what is themost important single step. I could take two day to move this thing forward.What's the most courageous thing I cald, do I think that these wonto tree thingsthey need to involve some fom of courage or they need to like clearly bemoving yourself in the right direction that you that your future self refletand I think the shorterth list, the...

...more simple and the more simple thehigher the motivation and the higher the likelihood you'll. Do it very, verypractical stuff that hay've been? Thank you so much for the time. Thank you forsharing your perspective. Anyxs so excited for you with the launch of thebook. Personality isn't permanent. Where can people pick that up and ifsomeone wants to continue the conversation that we started today,work in the just recout connect with you say: Hi Yeah Thinks James. You canget the book anywhere like it's and when bookstores reopen it'll definitelybe in there. There's a book F with Pang on Random House, so it's it'll be inevery book store. You can get an Amazon Kindle Arangenoble. If you go toBenjamin Hardy, do com, which is my website. You will find a video of meexplaining how if you buy the book, you can get access to three free onlinecourses. The book personal is 'mpermanent. I don't know if you cansee it, but basically it walks people through there's about a hundred andfifty journal promps that walk you through reframing former memories, oneof the key things that honestly shapes personality as former traumas thathaven't been resolved, basically things that have still like an emotionalsignature that you're carrying with you so there's ways to refraim the meaningof experiences and change. How you view the past there's also lots of promptsabout designing your future self for edesigning environment. So, like I haveseveral courses that I give away for free that take you thog the book. Thetteach you how to Joura Ilso have a course that teaches t e bloggingstrategies that I've used that have gotten me over literally. A hundredmillion blog views so there's a lot of free resources on my website that youcan learn about at Benjman hurry dotcom. So if you're, a market of financialbrand marketing leader cellsleader on the leadership team, connect with Bensign up by the book personality Ye, I get the free course just do it, becauseyou know, as we continued down this postcove and nineteen world, I'm moreexcited really like, and I think he use the Warin buffet quote twenty years is:Go it's going to be even better. This is just a moment in time and I'm reallyexcited to see all the opportunities that we can create, particularly asfinancial brands for the people in the communities that we serve for istustabout money. So yeah there ll be other big moments. Who knows in five yearsthree or seven years I mean this is a big one, but who knows what's going tohappen in the future, but we know that in the long term, future everything'sgoing a be better. It's exactly right BN. Thank you so much for joining me onanother episode of banking on digital growth. Today, for sure, until nexttime be well, do good and wash your hands. Thank you for listening to anotherepisode of banking on digital growth with James Robert Lay like what youhear tell a friend about the podcast and leave us a review on apple podcast,Google, podcast or spotify, and subscribe, while you're there to geteven more practical, improven insights vis it w ww don digital growth, dcom tograb a preview of James Robert's, best selling book banking on digital growth,or order a copy right now for you, and your team from Amazon inside you'llfind a strategic marketing and sales blueprint framed around twelve keyareas of focus that empower you to...

...confidently generate ten times moreloans and deposits. Until next time be well and do good.

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